Skip navigation
newsletter signup

Twitter Question of the Week

October 20, 2010
This week I asked my Twitter followers:

++Do You Have a Long-Tail Keyword Strategy?++

Here's what they said:

AlanBleiweiss: Yes. I put more emphasis on narrower individual page topics - 1 or 2 prime phrases. Long tail comes from the content. I don't go overboard in the longtail - a light touch goes a long way.

I80equipment09: Yes, we use some very specific long tails that are based off of our most competitive product keywords.

piconsulting: Long Tail Strategy - Get as much of it as possible.

rishil: Depends what that refers to. If you strengthen the site, long tail rankings will flow naturally. Key is to make it accessible. On other hand, for new biz sites I ask them to go after LT rankings first and leverage that to strengthen the site.

Jillís comment: Yay! It sounds like most who answered agree with my feelings on long tail keywords, i.e., that itís much more of a natural thing as long as you do everything else correctly.
 
Want to participate in the Twitter Question of the Week? Follow @jillwhalen on Twitter.
 
 
Post Comment

 Dan Broughton said:
Many of my clients use a CMS or other database driven system to add content. We have found that by adding in keyword markers to the global website content (header, left/right columns, footer) we can target long tail keywords (although some you could argue are gems).
Eg: They have their main page for "Cystitis treatment" - with the title of page being optimised for user, eg: "Cystitis treatment on prescription" - nice and clear, optimised for searches of "Cystitis treatment" - the primary phrase.
We then allow them to add keyword markers for placement in global content - an example is in the footer they have payment information "Buy online using all major credit cards" and icons of payment cards; also in right column details on site security and payment security: "Pay online safely - this site is encrypted using SSL", etc)
If they set the markers as "Cystitis treatment" and "for Cystitis treatment" the CMS then adds that into the mix in those content areas: "Buy Cystitis treatment online using all major credit cards", "Pay for Cystitis treatment online safely - this site is encrypted using SSL"
Voila - we have longtail phrases on the page for "Buy Cystitis treatment", "Buy Cystitis treatment", "Buy Cystitis treatment online", "Cystitis treatment online" - all phrases indicating user is intent on purchasing. These are also out of the way of the user and rarely noticed (being part of the global/common page 'furniture' and not the main central content).
They have seen many longtail keyphrases such as described above in our Ecommerce tab in Google analytics, are very happy and prosperous.
 Jill Whalen said:
@Dan

Thanks for posting the information, but you are definitely talking about keyword gems, not long-tail keywords, imo.
 Bill said:
I like Alan's phrase, "a light touch goes a long way". I think that's true. Make best effort to title the page well and make the first paragraph clear.
 Tim Cla said:
Long tailing can take up a lot of time which can make it less economic than it looks at first sight. Gems give immediate response and their value is more quantifiable.