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How To Optimized Image On Seo


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6 replies to this topic

#1 venvenla

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Posted 01 December 2015 - 02:40 AM

hello, my english not really good but i try to write clearly.

if i have a Image file to put on my website...

should i changes the filename like the keywords i use ?

and use the alt-tag for the file contain the keywords?



#2 chrishirst

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Posted 01 December 2015 - 09:41 AM

 

should i changes the filename like the keywords i use ?

and use the alt-tag for the file contain the keywords?

Nope! 

 

and

 

It's an alt attribute not a 'tag',  and the content of that is used as anchor text when the image is also a link THIRDLY it is NOT there for shoving 'key' words into.



#3 Michael Martinez

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Posted 02 December 2015 - 12:03 AM

The ALT= attribute should be used to describe the contents of the image.  It will be used by screen reading software in place of images, by text-only browsers in place of images, and by any modern browsers in place of images if their users disable loading of images or if the images for some reason do not load (such as when the user's computer is running low on memory and needs to be rebooted).

 

Suppose, for example, your picture shows a woman sitting on a chair reading a book.  Then appropriate ALT= text would be something like: "A seated woman reads a book."  You can write a more elaborate description of the picture if you feel it's important for non-sighted people (or people who cannot load the pictures) to know as many details as possible:  "A woman in a red dress sits in a mahogany deck chair on a cruise ship.  She is reading MOBY DICK and smiling at the camera."


Edited by Michael Martinez, 02 December 2015 - 12:03 AM.


#4 Mikl

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Posted 02 December 2015 - 05:35 AM

Just to add to the previous replies ....

 

I would always use the Alt attribute to describe the contents of a photograph, painting, drawing, etc, as Michael suggests. But I would go out of my way not to use it for "decorative" images, such as arrows and icons, that do nothing more than embellish the page. In those cases, I would include alt="" in my img tag, but leave the text empty. This is on the basis that someone using a screen-reader or who has images disabled does not need to know that these images exist, and any descriptions of them would be so much clutter.

 

I don't know whether this is good practice or not. If someone here tells you it is not, chances are they are right and I am wrong. But it just seems common sense to me.

 

To answer the original question, I certainly don't worry about keywords when I am writing Alt text. It's difficult enough as it is to come up with concise useful descriptions without having SEO to think about.

 

Mike


Edited by Mikl, 02 December 2015 - 05:36 AM.


#5 torka

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Posted 02 December 2015 - 12:05 PM

Mike, I have for years done exactly the same thing with any purely decorative images I use on web pages. As far as I know, this is the recommended practice.

 

If you leave out the alt="" bit, a screen reader will instead read the filename of the image, which -- if anything -- would be even more annoying than reading an alt description such as "ornate black decorative element." By using alt="" you suppress both, effectively making the graphic "invisible" to the screen reader, non-intrusive and non-annoying to those who choose not to / cannot view the actual graphic image.

 

--Torka :oldfogey:



#6 Mikl

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Posted 03 December 2015 - 11:51 AM

Good to know that I have been heading in the right direction all these years, Torka. Thanks.

 

Mike



#7 venvenla

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Posted 05 December 2015 - 09:37 AM

thank you for the answer i will consider all the suggestion from all of you. thank you ^^






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