Jump to content

  • Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Subscribe to HRA Now!

 



Are you a Google Analytics enthusiast?

Share and download Custom Google Analytics Reports, dashboards and advanced segments--for FREE! 

 



 

 www.CustomReportSharing.com 

From the folks who brought you High Rankings!



Photo

Live Chat Tool On Website Used Improperly By Sales Team


  • Please log in to reply
16 replies to this topic

#1 AvyGuttman

AvyGuttman

    HR 3

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 95 posts
  • Location:Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Posted 06 October 2015 - 10:59 AM

Hi Everyone,

 

This may be interesting and useful to those people who implement a chat tool on to their websites. For me, I added the software to a website so that customers had the option to ask questions when they felt the need and be helped along the way. The visitors can be tracked in real time. To me, this is a customer service tool first and foremost and can be a sales tool when used properly and in fact it is great for selling, up-selling etc...since selling and customer service do overlap.

 

I went on line to the website one day and was there about 15 seconds when the chat tool chimed up and a sales rep asked me if I needed any assistance. I ignored it. When I arrived at the office the next day, I held a meeting with the sales team and explained to them that an added pop up with this type of sales approach is counter to the way the live chat tool should be used. I explained that chat is a tool which empowers the customer to ask anything

they want, when they want. People need time to look around the website and interact with the content, products, information etc.

 

The sales team were baffled. They argued that they can make sales with the tool. I explained that even if they do make sales, that perhaps those customers were already inclined to make purchases anyways and that by jumping in early with the live chat they are not focusing on those potential customers they may be causing to leave early, nor return

and it may give them the impression they are being watched that in the end may end up costing a sale. Thankfully their sales manager agreed with me and had a meeting with them this morning. They are pissed! At me mostly ;) and thats fine. I stand by my point.

 

Still, my question is more of an add your opinion here if you would like to and perhaps offer your perspective. I do feel that if the sales team notices a website visitor is stuck on a page for a long time, especially the checkout, for example -then I would say it is a good time for the salesperson to initiate the conversation through chat and offer some help, even if the person had not asked for it yet.

 

Thanks for your opinions on this matter :)


Edited by AvyGuttman, 06 October 2015 - 11:11 AM.


#2 chrishirst

chrishirst

    A not so moderate moderator.

  • Moderator
  • 7,718 posts
  • Location:Blackpool UK

Posted 06 October 2015 - 01:19 PM

 

 

I went on line to the website one day and was there about 15 seconds when the chat tool chimed up and a sales rep asked me if I needed any assistance.

 

When that happens, ... ... I leave.

 

I also do the same in the physical world when accosted by some spotty youth with a "sales executive"  badge, when I have only one foot inside the shop/store. If I really HAVE to stay in that shop, the assistant usually gets a cursory look up and down, followed by "I doubt it" in response to his scripted "Can I help you"? 

 

 

 

and it may give them the impression they are being watched that in the end may end up costing a sale. Thankfully their sales manager agreed with me and had a meeting with them this morning. They are pissed! At me mostly  ;) and thats fine. I stand by my point.

 

You are absolutely right, it's just so damned creepy, 



#3 AvyGuttman

AvyGuttman

    HR 3

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 95 posts
  • Location:Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Posted 06 October 2015 - 01:53 PM

Update: Now the sales team has decided to boycott the chat tool altogether which only proves my suspicion that  they were abusing the chat tool in the first place as a sales channel and nothing more. Offering customer service is not simply providing a service to possibly close a sale but rather to offer up help for the sake of help/service. That is what customer service is all about. Providing a service period. Oh well. I will have to speak to their manager yet again. Any other suggestions for how to go about this?



#4 chrishirst

chrishirst

    A not so moderate moderator.

  • Moderator
  • 7,718 posts
  • Location:Blackpool UK

Posted 06 October 2015 - 05:20 PM

Give them the same treatment if they happen to walk anywhere near your office.  They'll soon find out how annoying it is.



#5 Mikl

Mikl

    HR 5

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 345 posts
  • Location:Edinburgh, Scotland

Posted 07 October 2015 - 05:12 AM

In the real world, I think the best situation is when you enter a store, and the sales assistant (spotty or otherwise) welcomes you with words to the effect: "Good morning. Let me know if you need any help", and then leaves you to browse on your own.

 

A good chat tool would work in the same way. Make it obvious to the visitor that the tool is available if and when needed, but don't throw it in their face, or force them to respond in some way before they can start browsing the site.

 

Mike


  • chrishirst likes this

#6 qwerty

qwerty

    HR 10

  • Moderator
  • 8,695 posts
  • Location:Somerville, MA

Posted 07 October 2015 - 05:33 AM

I think your experience is pretty common. This happens on one of my clients' sites as well, and I don't think it's a matter of someone in the sales department "seeing" someone on the site and deciding to offer help. It's automated, and a salesperson doesn't see you unless and until you respond to the suggested chat.

 

Checking the site now (6:30 am my time and theirs), there's just a link that will pop up a window where I can leave them a message, so apparently it only offers to chat during business hours. (And they're a global company, so that's a little odd, actually.)

 

I think it's really a matter of getting the invitation right. If the text offering a chat is worded in the way Mike suggested above that it should work in the real world, I don't think that would bother anyone, and it would function as a polite call to action.


  • chrishirst likes this

#7 chrishirst

chrishirst

    A not so moderate moderator.

  • Moderator
  • 7,718 posts
  • Location:Blackpool UK

Posted 07 October 2015 - 07:40 AM

Exactly, you have to appeal to human nature. which is of course is different for both sexes. Women will respond positively to someone offering assistance politely and promptly. Men do NOT regardless of how polite it may be, as it is an affront to our evolved skills as a hunter. Marketing and closing a sale is a psychological game  and a 'good' salesman|saleswoman 'knows' when to 'chip in'.

 

Women, when shopping know exactly what they want but will look around to find something different and would like some help to find that 'different thing'. That's why they go out to buy 'those' shoes, they come back having bought a different pair of shoes and a jacket, and a skirt plus a new handbag 

 

Men, when shopping, aren't that sure what it is they want, but will know it when they find it and they do NOT need anybody's help to track it down. That's why when men go shopping they will quite happily return home have bought nothing at all but they do know the best places to go buy a TV, a Blu-Ray player, a dual DVD player, a Sat-Nav, a watch that shows the time in ten countries that he will never visit, a lawnmower for the grass you don't have in your flat and a sign to go on rear window of his car that says 'F*** You' in eight languages at the press of a button. 



#8 Michael Martinez

Michael Martinez

    HR 10

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,325 posts
  • Location:Georgia

Posted 07 October 2015 - 09:22 AM

You want to avoid a sales-vs-service war.  I have gone through those and they never turn out well.

 

The sales team may have been abusing the tool (I personally hate those popup chat boxes that magically appear out of nowhere) but you have divided the team with your objections to their behavior.

 

The sales team will trust you less in the future and will be less likely to take your advice at times when they need it, even if your interaction with them is very minimal (perhaps even more so because of that).

 

To be correct at the cost of losing team value and trust is a Pyrrhic victory, a victory not really worth achieving.


  • AvyGuttman likes this

#9 torka

torka

    Vintage Babe

  • Moderator
  • 4,825 posts
  • Location:Triangle area, NC, USA, Earth (usually)

Posted 07 October 2015 - 11:28 AM

I agree with Michael -- divisions among different groups within the company is usually not a productive situation.

 

But it may not be too late?

 

Since their focus is (obviously) on making sales -- they are the Sales team, after all, not the customer service team (and I'm sure that's how they see it, even if they don't choose to express it that way) -- could you refocus the discussion into how proper use of the chat tool can help them increase sales?

 

That is, instead of saying (in essence) "You're doing it wrong!" (followed up with "You're still doing it wrong, just now a different kind of wrong!") can you turn it around to "You can generate more sales and income for you and the company by trying it this way."?

 

My :02:

 

--Torka :oldfogey:


Edited by torka, 07 October 2015 - 11:29 AM.


#10 Jill

Jill

    Recovering SEO

  • Admin
  • 33,244 posts

Posted 10 October 2015 - 04:26 PM

If it makes more sales, use it. If not, don't. 


  • chrishirst likes this

#11 chrishirst

chrishirst

    A not so moderate moderator.

  • Moderator
  • 7,718 posts
  • Location:Blackpool UK

Posted 11 October 2015 - 07:45 AM

If it makes more sales, use it. If not, don't. 

 

'Nuff said, methinks. :)


  • Jill likes this

#12 AvyGuttman

AvyGuttman

    HR 3

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 95 posts
  • Location:Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Posted 11 October 2015 - 02:44 PM

If it makes more sales, use it. If not, don't. 

But Does "it" ever truly make sales? That was the argument of the sales team : "But, we make sales with it"... How many of those sales were people with full intent to buy in the first place? This argument is rhetorical. Even if it helps coerce, guide and close the sale, so to speak, at what cost to those missed opportunities when it upsets innumerable potential sales?

 

For instance, for every sale "it" makes or helps make, it can just as well scare away 10 potential sales in its wake. I guess, a better question then would be how to measure the feasibility and application and strategy approach to apply when using the chat tool in tandem with a website's given audience. Is there a way to integrate this into Google Analytics and have the numbers do some talking after some time testing? Bounce rate for example can be a number of factors, how can it be isolated with the chat feature to measure if the chat tool is causing an increase in people leaving after being "approached" by the chat feature?


Edited by AvyGuttman, 11 October 2015 - 03:22 PM.


#13 AvyGuttman

AvyGuttman

    HR 3

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 95 posts
  • Location:Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Posted 11 October 2015 - 03:17 PM

I agree with Michael -- divisions among different groups within the company is usually not a productive situation.

 

But it may not be too late?

 

Since their focus is (obviously) on making sales -- they are the Sales team, after all, not the customer service team (and I'm sure that's how they see it, even if they don't choose to express it that way) -- could you refocus the discussion into how proper use of the chat tool can help them increase sales?

 

That is, instead of saying (in essence) "You're doing it wrong!" (followed up with "You're still doing it wrong, just now a different kind of wrong!") can you turn it around to "You can generate more sales and income for you and the company by trying it this way."?

 

My :02:

 

--Torka :oldfogey:

Yes, I also agree. I have provided the "you can make more sales in the long run" approach by letting the customer look around and then come to them when and if they need assistance. I said before, there is an 800 number in the top left corner on every page and a live chat tool. I personally think asking if someone needs assistance is akin to saying" Hey there, you want to buy something? Because I definitely want the credit and commission for it" ...Visitors are smart enough to see text and pictures and know what to do, there isnt a major amount of confusion there. If they cant tell one model from the next, or are indecisive, they are well aware of the avenues where they can ask for assistance if they so choose. The chat tool is a customers tool and it empowers them. It is the customers tool after all.

 

Metaphor : An older woman needs assistance crossing the street and someone jumps over and helps her because deep down inside, they feel there is a possibility of reward. You can see if she needs help or not because this is more a visual experience. Even still, the older woman's pride may keep her from asking or make her uncomfortable being asked if she needs assistance. Nonetheless, there are two main approaches to this...providing a service for the sake of providing a service or providing a service for the potentiality of reward and this, the latter, is the drive of the sales team I speak of and it can be transparent and obvious in their approach and goal. I mean, honestly, do they really want to offer a service of aid or are they providing help with the sole intent and drive of the possible reward? I am in camp number two. They are result driven and the only result they comprehend is making a sale. They do not see or think in the long term and there is no telling them how to do anything because of this short term, immutable approach and perspective. 



#14 AvyGuttman

AvyGuttman

    HR 3

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 95 posts
  • Location:Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Posted 11 October 2015 - 04:31 PM

You want to avoid a sales-vs-service war.  I have gone through those and they never turn out well.

 

The sales team may have been abusing the tool (I personally hate those popup chat boxes that magically appear out of nowhere) but you have divided the team with your objections to their behavior.

 

The sales team will trust you less in the future and will be less likely to take your advice at times when they need it, even if your interaction with them is very minimal (perhaps even more so because of that).

 

To be correct at the cost of losing team value and trust is a Pyrrhic victory, a victory not really worth achieving.

I totally agree but am still at a stand still no matter what. I just dont say anything to the sales team and watch as people who visit the site leave faster and more often and possibly not return. Or, I say something and this divides the sales team and loses their trust in my opinions even if they are right. So, either way I need to kiss their behind to avoid making a point that will cost me more in the end if I am correct or I just sit back and watch them screw things up. Sounds like both choices are in the sales team favor and I dare say that without even realizing it they can hold any outside perspective as hostage to their voracious appetite for the short term sale approach.

 

Maybe the sales team I am speaking of are low tier, by maybe, lets just say I am being polite because it is a certainty, and Id also say they are not the brightest people, otherwise an open conversation would have taken place or at least the willingness to at least attempt my suggestion first and then make a decisions after. "WE MAKE SALES WITH THE CHAT" is not a viable argument and for them its their ace in the hole despite the fact that it leaves out so many other factors to even have value if it were even true, and that also means they are solely focused on one result.


Edited by AvyGuttman, 11 October 2015 - 04:34 PM.


#15 chrishirst

chrishirst

    A not so moderate moderator.

  • Moderator
  • 7,718 posts
  • Location:Blackpool UK

Posted 12 October 2015 - 04:03 AM

 

 

But Does "it" ever truly make sales? That was the argument of the sales team : "But, we make sales with it"... How many of those sales were people with full intent to buy in the first place? This argument is rhetorical. 

That is what A/B and multi-variate testing is for, you test  the various scenarios/versions and compare the results  in terms of conversions. After all is said and done ... ... only your visitors and/or customers can really tell you what works and what doesn't.


  • Jill likes this




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

We are now a read-only forum.
 
No new posts or registrations allowed.