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Ttfb Question


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6 replies to this topic

#1 boolfish

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Posted 10 August 2015 - 03:13 AM

Does anyone know about TTFB?

Amazon.com TTFB is 50ms.

3dsystems.com TTFB is 109ms.

My website TTFB is around 900ms.

I have tried to use Amazon CloudFont and change our VPS to a dedicated server. But it still not under 700ms.

 

My website is based on wordpress.

 

How can i improve my TTFB? Could anyone help?



#2 Jill

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Posted 10 August 2015 - 08:51 AM

Why do you care?



#3 Ron Carnell

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Posted 10 August 2015 - 11:04 AM

The first thing to do is determine whether the slow response time is your fault or your web host's fault.

 

Deactivate all plug-ins and change your theme to one of the default themes that come with WordPress. If your TTFB improves you can start narrowing down the problem by activating the code one at a time. If TTFB does not improve you can start looking for a new web host.


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#4 boolfish

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Posted 10 August 2015 - 11:23 AM

Hi Admin, because TTFB will effect the ranking of our website keywords. Faster website, more help to the SEO.

 

Thanks Moderator, i will try them.



#5 chrishirst

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Posted 10 August 2015 - 12:20 PM

 

 

because TTFB will effect the ranking of our website keywords.

According to whom??



#6 AvyGuttman

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Posted 10 August 2015 - 08:09 PM

 

Does anyone know about TTFB?

Amazon.com TTFB is 50ms.

3dsystems.com TTFB is 109ms.

My website TTFB is around 900ms.

I have tried to use Amazon CloudFont and change our VPS to a dedicated server. But it still not under 700ms.

 

My website is based on wordpress.

 

How can i improve my TTFB? Could anyone help?

 

The day your site is an exact replica in every way possible to amazon, only then you should contemplate having a page speed faster than they offer. Page speed is one of over 200+ ranking signals. Are you fretting over other factors with as much zeal? Page speed is good for user experience and potentially it can help improve your conversions and keep your site visitors happy because they don't have a millisecond to spare.

 

Pretend you were able to improve TTFB to an even faster rate than Amazon. Here are some things to consider:

 

1) Did you bother improving this for your audience or because you thought it would improve your rankings?

2) A lousy website is still a lousy website no matter how fast it loads

3) Not to say you have a lousy website but think of all the more important factors involved that would make your visitors and customers happier and earn you more revenue. Is speed going to make that big a difference or are there other areas that may need some more attention?


Edited by AvyGuttman, 10 August 2015 - 08:14 PM.

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#7 Michael Martinez

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Posted 10 August 2015 - 10:53 PM

Changing hosts may not necessarily improve your Time to First Byte even if you have the leanest, cleanest code on the Internet.  A lot of the major hosts have moved their shared hosting clients (and many virtual server clients) to cloud-based hosting, and they have done a poor job of managing resources.  I'm talking about big hosting companies like GoDaddy and Rackspace (to name just two of several we have tested).

 

You can try to mitigate for server loads by speeding up your site but if you don't control the server you are at the Web hosting company's mercy, and there are many non-Web things that affect server performance.

 

For example, in order for a simple self-installed WordPress site (it's your own domain) to handle contact forms, you have to have a running email service.  That service can be targeted by botnets looking for spam relays and the traffic is a huge drag on server performance.  Even if they cannot get in, the botnets can hit the server thousands of times per day and force it to respond every time.

 

In a cloud environment the email services might be running on another machine, but you have no guarantees.

 

Another way botnets can hurt your service is when you share a server with Websites that are being targeted by botnet probes.  For example, they look for the login pages on self-hosted blogs (WordPress, Drupal, Joomla, Blogger, Tumblr, etc.) and hammer those with attempts to login.

 

If you're using a Content Delivery Network that changes the mix.  But they can delay posting updates to your site and may charge you for additional bandwidth if your site is hit by a botnet probing attack.

 

Before you start looking for another host, make sure you defend your Website against botnets.  Also, see if you can implement automatic file compression and browser cache expiration dates.  Some hosting companies do not allow you to do these things, so you need to test what you can implement in your htaccess or IP config files.

 

Other services that may be under constant attack include FTP and telnet (shell access).  Leaving these services active when you don't use them is just asking for trouble.

 

Botnets don't just probe the blogs for vulnerabilities.  They go after ecommerce sites, forums, and just about any "canned" software that is widely distributed.  If there is a login page associated with whatever you have installed on your site, you would do well to restrict who can access it and if possible to rename it to something they cannot get to.

 

Make sure you keep your SQL databases cleaned up.  Get rid of all the junk that clutters them.  For example, many bloggers mistakenly believe it is sufficient to just mark unwanted comments as spam.  You can end up with thousands of these comments in your database and they slow down processing.  They should be deleted, along with old drafts of published content that you are sure you will never need (make sure you have frequent backups of your database-stored content).

 

Some people may be putting too many sites into their hosting accounts.  You only get so many resources such as disk space, memory, CPU time, and TCP connections.  If you are running too many sites they may max out your account resources and slow each other down.  I'm not saying you should get a separate hosting account for every site you run but you don't want to go with the cheapest solution unless you really don't get much traffic.

 

Quite often I find that people's Web hosting problems are not due so much to the hosting companies' faults as to the users' inexperience and unreasonable expectations.  Maybe the advertising doesn't make it clear that one-size-never-fits-all but ultimately it is up to you, the customer, to understand what it is you are paying for and what your real needs are.


Edited by Michael Martinez, 10 August 2015 - 10:53 PM.





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