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Blog For Seo Purposes


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5 replies to this topic

#1 Ibracadabra

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Posted 13 May 2015 - 02:30 AM

Hello,

 

nowadays you can read a lot about how content is great for SEO and how starting a blog could boost your site's SEO. That is all great and reasonable, hence I've launched a blog that is a sub-domain to a apple devices e-commerce website and provides, I think, unique and valuable tips, tricks and info about apple products in general.

So far, it has rather mediocre organic traffic, but its getting better, and about 10% of people visiting the post visits also our shop. Cool.

However, I struggle to understand and find what exactly has to be done to help my e-commerce SEO with the blog? Should I try to drive more traffic from the blog to e-commerce products that the post is related to? That wouldnt be a SEO factor for a e-commerce product, would it? Or perhaps should I copy the post, eg. about cool iPhone apps to iPhone product and add a rel="canonical" FROM the blog TO the product? How to utilize the blog to bring more SEO juice to the product/category?



#2 Jill

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Posted 13 May 2015 - 03:14 AM

You were misinformed. The great paradox of SEO is if you do anything "for SEO purposes" then it won't work. 



#3 torka

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Posted 13 May 2015 - 09:15 AM

Blogging is content marketing, not SEO. Any SEO benefits you might see from your blog are (and should be) side-effects, not the reason for the blog's existence.

 

Your blog is driving traffic to your store, which is exactly what you want to have happen. That's what good content marketing does. Keep posting information that's good and useful for customers. Link from the blog to your store when and where it makes sense (keep in mind that "useful for the customers" mantra and you'll do fine). You're already using your blog just as you should be, and in return it's doing just what it should be doing.

 

--Torka :oldfogey:



#4 Ibracadabra

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Posted 14 May 2015 - 06:46 AM

You were misinformed. The great paradox of SEO is if you do anything "for SEO purposes" then it won't work. 

 

rel=canonicals and duplicated content removal also counts? Because I have made some important changes in that regard and there are absolutely no statistically important changes in ranks. Neither there were when and after the Panda hit. Or there was small... improvement in organic traffic despite having tons of duplicated and generally non-valuable content in e-commerce shop



#5 torka

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Posted 14 May 2015 - 11:22 AM

Removing duplicate content isn't necessarily going to help with rankings. First, what you think is "duplicate content" may or may not be duplicate in the eyes of Google. Beyond that, Google simply filters duplicated content. They don't penalize pages because of duplicated content (other than in the sense that they pick one page to show while the duplicated content is not displayed). And the filter is query-specific.

 

For example, if you have two "mad-lib spam" pages about pizza that are identical except that one targets "New York" and the other targets "Chicago", when someone searches for "pizza in New York" the first page might show (and the second would be filtered). When someone searches for "pizza in Chicago" the second page would have a chance of showing up (and the first would be filtered). For someone who simply searches for "pizza" one or the other might show, but it would be up to Google to decide which one. If you rewrote the Chicago page so the content is now unique, the first page might still show for "pizza in New York" and the second page might show for "pizza in Chicago." For someone who searches only for "pizza" there's an outside chance both pages might now show in the results (but no guarantee, of course). And just as before, each page will stand on it's own merits (how good the content, what kinds of links pointing to it, and all the other hundreds of signals that Google uses). Neither page will rank higher for any query simply because you got rid of the duplication.

 

rel=canonical can be useful when it's needed. Like XML sitemaps, however, many webmasters have acquired the mistaken belief that these sorts of things are imperative for "good SEO" and implementing them will result in some magical increase in rankings. If your pages were already only indexed under one URL per page, then "rel=canonical" won't make any difference. If your pages are already indexed, an XML sitemap won't do anything for you. In any case, the purpose of both those things is simply to make sure content is indexed under the proper/preferred URL. They aren't going to make a crappy page rank any better.

 

The point is to do things that are useful for your site visitors (which can include search engine spiders) and not to waste time doing things simply because you think you need to do them for "SEO purposes."

 

--Torka :oldfogey:



#6 Michael Martinez

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Posted 14 May 2015 - 02:46 PM

The idea of writing a blog in conjunction with an ecommerce site is to give you a place where you can share interesting information with people who are interested in your products.  If you focus on being a helpful resource you should earn some recognition from visitors and customers.

 

Simply doing that "for SEO" is the wrong approach because you stop thinking about what you can do for your visitors and focus (way too much) on what you can do for search engines.

 

Search engines do not buy your products.  People do.

 

The search engine optimization strategy should be about creating content that people will want to find and helping the search engines position that content well in relevant queries.






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