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How Do You Know When Links Are "bad" From A Categorical Perspe


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#1 richfern17

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Posted 10 March 2015 - 03:02 PM

Alrighty I know with all the Google updates linking from an unrelated site is a big no no. My question is this:
 

What exactly constitiutes a webstie from being out of category from another?

 

Example: I do SEO for a restoration company. They water damage removal, flooded basements, etc. and also do some construction. Now I am manually building links through comments, can I link from "Home" blogs like DIY, home interior design, lifestyle blogs?

 

 

Here are a few examples:

 

REMOVED

 

Obviously I don't want to get hit with a penalty, but I also don't want to waste my time building subpar links to the website.

 

 

Here is my website:

 

REMOVED


Edited by chrishirst, 10 March 2015 - 04:28 PM.


#2 chrishirst

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Posted 10 March 2015 - 04:29 PM

 

 

How Do You Know When Links Are "bad" 

 

You were the one responsible for placing them.


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#3 torka

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Posted 11 March 2015 - 09:03 AM

Alrighty I know with all the Google updates linking from an unrelated site is a big no no.

Says who?

 

What makes a site "unrelated"? And what makes you think Google cares about "sites"? They don't rank sites, they rank pages.

 

Beyond that, what's "related" is very much in the eye of the beholder, which is why Google really doesn't care. Seriously, they don't.

 

To clarify why, let's start with outbound links.

 

If on one page of your site, you link out to an external page that contains useful information which the people visiting that page on your site would be interested in, then that's a good link. For instance, if you run a website that sells shoes, on your product support page you can link to a page on a crafting site that contains a great article about how to repair scratches in leather. It's useful and interesting information that your site visitors might like to know, to help them maintain and care for the shoes they bought from you. And because you were the one who clued them in to this tip, they might be more inclined to come back to you the next time they need footwear.

 

On the surface, you'd say a shoe store site and a crafting site are not "related." In fact, the leather-care article is quite relevant for leather-shoe-owners. And the link is good, both for you (because it helps keep your customers happy and might eventually help you make more sales) and for the crating site (because it sends them more visitors, some of whom might stick around and read more of their content).

 

You know what? Google doesn't care if the two pages appear on the surface to be related or not. What they care about is that the shoe store page linked out to the leather-care page all on their own, because they liked the page's content. That's called an "editorial link" and it's the kind of thing Google wishes everyone would do. (Instead of all this focus on "link building" and "link juice" and "PageRank" and all.)

 

It works the same way with inbound links. Don't worry about whether the "site" is related. Remember that both links and rankings take place at the page level. Stop thinking about "building links" and instead focus on "building relationships" (with webmasters of sites that attract the same audience you want to attract). Once they get to know you and your excellent content, they may be inclined to grant you an editorial link or two. And those are the kinds of links that will help you, not only with rankings but also with sending direct traffic. They are what Google calls "good links."

 

--Torka :oldfogey:


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#4 richfern17

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Posted 11 March 2015 - 11:42 AM

That you very much for your answer Torka. You put into perspective. I guess I was referring article directory websites where they have lots of different topics but I guess that those are ok too as long as the article is original?


Thanks for your response Torka. Does the same go for Article directory sites then? High PR ones, that is.

Edited by chrishirst, 11 March 2015 - 03:41 PM.


#5 chrishirst

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Posted 11 March 2015 - 03:48 PM

 

 

 I guess I was referring article directory websites where they have lots of different topics but I guess that those are ok too as long as the article is original?

 

Nope.

 

 

 

Does the same go for Article directory sites then? High PR ones, that is. 

 

Nope!

 

 

Looking at the useless PR display AND considering "article directories" as being "useful" is simply compounding the errors.



#6 richfern17

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Posted 12 March 2015 - 08:15 AM

This is all very enlightening, I have read people like Neil Patel state that PR is very important, if not just for the fact it is good practice. My final question is then, I guess, how do people link build in the post penguin, 2015 world? Guest Posts, blog comments?

 

Thanks. 



#7 torka

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Posted 12 March 2015 - 09:17 AM

Sigh.

 

It shouldn't surprise me, but it is disappointing that here in 2015 we still have to go over this one more time. PageRank (the real PageRank that Google uses as a ranking factor) is important. At least, it's important in the sense that it's probably one of several more influential ranking factors out of the over 200 ranking factors that Google considers in total.

The thing is, the PageRank mere mortals such as you and I can see is Toolbar PageRank (which we sometimes abbreviate at TBPR). This is an approximation of what a page's real PageRank might possibly have been at some unknown point in the past. In fact, Google has indicated they are not going to be updating this TBPR going forward, so the numbers -- already seriously out of date -- are just going to become more and more dated and inaccurate and useless as time passes.

 

Real PageRank (the actual number that Google uses) is a closely-guarded secret, and is updated continuously. It is not published or made available anywhere outside the Googleplex. Nobody ever knows the real PR that's been assigned to any of their pages. Never. Not ever. There is no tool, anywhere, that can show you real PageRank. Not one. There may be some that claim to do so (I don't know, because I don't pay attention to any of them) but if they do they are lying. Period, end of story.

 

So, to cut to the chase: judging the "quality" of a site by looking at the outdated and meaningless TBPR number is not productive. Since it is no longer being updated, it's usefulness in judging... well... anything is only going to become less and less over time.

 

Forgive me, please, if I have misread your intent, but it sounds to me as though you are still looking for a fast and easy way to place links yourself. While it may benefit your site in the short run (if you're lucky enough to stumble over a site that allows you to post your own links and that Google hasn't yet started ignoring), in the long run this is not a productive strategy.

 

As to how people "build links" these days, please re-read:

Stop thinking about "building links" and instead focus on "building relationships" (with webmasters of sites that attract the same audience you want to attract). Once they get to know you and your excellent content, they may be inclined to grant you an editorial link or two. And those are the kinds of links that will help you, not only with rankings but also with sending direct traffic. They are what Google calls "good links."

 

--Torka :oldfogey:



#8 richfern17

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Posted 12 March 2015 - 10:29 AM

I was out of the SEO game for awhile, times have certainly changed. It's not that I want to black hat and I don't want easy links.  I am operating a restoration website, there's not too many people who's interest falls into that category, except competitors.

 

I maintain a blog and stay active on social media, I just want a more tangible, direct way to push results. I'm getting paid to do this... I want to do a good job. 

 

So, from what else I read and your above quote, it's all about content marketing now? I just have to produce great blog posts, videos, etc. and the links will come? 



#9 chrishirst

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Posted 12 March 2015 - 03:33 PM

 

 

I just have to produce great blog posts, videos, etc. and the links will come? 

Maybe, ... Maybe not, it's of little consequence either way.

 

 

 

So, from what else I read and your above quote, it's all about content marketing now?

 

Nope! It's exactly what it has ALWAYS been, doing what is best for real human visitors. 



#10 richfern17

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Posted 12 March 2015 - 03:56 PM

So are you saying link building isn't important anymore? Unfortunately, I don't think the Google algorithm can quantitatively measure what we do for visitors.

 

Thank you very much for your time, hopefully this will be my last questions:

 

What do SEO services do, then? 



#11 Jill

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Posted 12 March 2015 - 06:36 PM

So, from what else I read and your above quote, it's all about content marketing now? I just have to produce great blog posts, videos, etc. and the links will come? 

 

 

They won't just come. You have to let people know your content exists by promoting it wherever those people who might link to it happen to be.



#12 chrishirst

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Posted 13 March 2015 - 03:58 AM

 

 

 Unfortunately, I don't think the Google algorithm can quantitatively measure what we do for visitors.

 

Not necessarily true. However, they CAN measure what you do for search engines pretty accurately.



#13 torka

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Posted 13 March 2015 - 09:10 AM

You might check out the thoughts of our moderator, Debra Matsteler, at Link Spiel and of Eric Ward (AKA "Link Moses"). They both are recognized within the SEO community as linking experts and have some excellent thoughts on how to do that "relationship building" thing I mentioned as well as other good marketing tactics that can help you earn the kinds of links you need.

 

--Torka :






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