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How To Speed Up Your Website?


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9 replies to this topic

#1 webtopshare

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Posted 13 December 2014 - 03:06 AM

What is the effect of fast website to Search Engine Optimization? What is the way to speed up wordpress website?



#2 chrishirst

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Posted 13 December 2014 - 03:35 AM

None at all.

 

Run it on a fast server.



#3 Mikl

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Posted 13 December 2014 - 04:13 AM

There are many well-documented suggestions for speeding up websites. In my (limited) experience, one of the most useful is not to overload the site with huge images. If the site contains photos or other images, consider reducing their sizes as far as possible, and perhaps also increase the compression, consistent with maintaining an adequate image quality. These two small changes can make a big difference in performance.

 

Mike



#4 webtopshare

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Posted 13 December 2014 - 08:47 AM

Thank you. I used W3 total cache and resized images before upload to host. Anything else?



#5 chrishirst

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Posted 14 December 2014 - 09:56 AM

Yeah!

 

Stop thinking that 'speed' makes any real, significant difference.



#6 hardwells

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Posted 14 December 2014 - 02:44 PM

Speed does make a difference. people are impatient online and aren't going to want to wait for a slow website.

 

I would also check to see if your hosting provider is good and that you aren't on a cheap shared hosting server. I had a wordpress site that was super slow and on shared hosting. I upgraded my hosting provider and BAM! it was fast.



#7 TheSEOMonkey

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Posted 14 December 2014 - 02:59 PM

So, I have seen websites that are very fast visually, however, when you look at the metrix it's all in the red...which matters most? The actual numbers or how it performs? Or both?



#8 chrishirst

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Posted 14 December 2014 - 03:55 PM

 

Speed does make a difference. people are impatient online and aren't going to want to wait for a slow website.

 

But it makes no real difference to search engines


So, I have seen websites that are very fast visually, however, when you look at the metrix it's all in the red...which matters most? The actual numbers or how it performs? Or both?

 

I think that you have answered your own question there, or do you believe silly 'tools' over your own REAL observations?



#9 chrishirst

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Posted 14 December 2014 - 04:05 PM

 

Speed does make a difference. people are impatient online and aren't going to want to wait for a slow website.

 

Soooo at the risk of repeating myself .... again.

 

The ONLY thing you need to do IS:

 

clear your browser(s) cache.

 

type in a URL on your site NOT THE 'HOME' page.

 

Press [Enter]

 

If YOU get hacked off waiting for it to load, ... ... Then you have a problem.



#10 Michael Martinez

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Posted 15 December 2014 - 12:41 PM

Search engines have been slow to use speed as a ranking/weighting factor because so many Websites "run slow" (based on the average length of time consumers are happy to wait for pages to load and render). Google so far says its speed algorithm only affects the worst 1% of all Websites. If you're not in the bottom 2% you probably don't need to worry about your rankings on any search engine.

The Google AdSense service (and perhaps other advertising networks) does rate site quality in terms of "speed" (loading and rendering time). Their tools are absolutely awful but when they red-mark a site it may be worthwhile to look at improving the speed.

You can do a few things to speed up a PHP-delivered Website, depending on what kind of server you are using. I know there are ways to optimize performance on Microsoft IIS servers but I am not an IIS guy.

In Apache (Linux systems) you can add some code to your .htaccess file that compresses files. Compressed files take up less space and require less transfer activity. All modern Web browsers can decompress these files very, very quickly. If you don't know how to modify your .htaccess file or cannot do so, then you would be better to look for a plugin that does this for you.

Caching plugins work by rendering your pages, saving them to your server's hard drive, and then delivering those fully-rendered pages as static HTML files. They are super fast. But people experience problems with updating their sites and sometimes with other plugins, so caching is a hit-or-miss experience.

Running a fast server helps a great deal, to be sure, but most people cannot or will not pay for the faster servers. If you are using shared hosting you are at the mercy of the hundreds of other sites that share your server (or cloud servers).

Using smaller image files helps, too (and using fewer images). You can reduce the file sizes by decreasing the number of colors and dots-per-inch settings on your images. However, for many Web designers this feels like a step back into the dark ages.

You can also change your images to more efficient formats like .GIF, .JPG, and .PNG (to name just a few).

If you use a lot of plugins, though, they can also slow down your Website. Even on a cached Website some plugins will still fire off for unmodified content; and all new pages have to be rendered at least once. Also, every time you clear the Website cache you have to wait for all the pages to be served again for them to be cached again.

Also, a Website that uses an SQL database can experience run-time slowdowns if the database is not optimized periodically (it depends on how much use/traffic it gets). Optimizing SQL databases can be done through the administrative dashboard but there are blog plugins that will do this for you.

If you allow your themes and plugins to fall behind the blog software you may create incompatibilities that affect site performance.

Botnets and spammer tools also adversely impact a Website's performance. You need to implement protective measures to defend the site against probes and intrusive content.

But like Chris said above, the search engines don't care about most Websites' speed. If you're going to optimize a site for speed you do it for the visitor experience.
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