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New Site Struggling With Page Rank


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25 replies to this topic

#1 nickh

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Posted 16 November 2014 - 10:51 AM

Hi all,

 

A few months ago I completed the development of a new website, designed to simply promote company services and generally encourage sales enquiries.  The previous site has been around for a few years, but was extremely basic.  It was previously hosted on a .com domain, and the new site exists under the same name, but with a .co.uk domain suffix.  I created 301 redirects (and confirmed that they produce the expected HTTP status code when pages of the old site are requested).  I built the new site using Orchard - a modern CMS, and I'm happy with the mark-up on each page.  I've configured the robots.txt file as I see fit, and confirmed that Googlebot can access it.  I've hooked the site up to a GA account, and Webmaster Tools reports no suggested HTML improvements.  I've read through High Ranking's SEO architecture section, and believe that my site's content is generally pretty good.

 

When searching for the site's main intended search term REMOVED, the site doesn't even appear anywhere in the list of results, and I'm struggling to understand why.  With all the above taken into consideration, please could anyone suggest areas in which I could improve the site's rank?  The website is REMOVED

 

Thanks in advance.

 

Nick


Edited by chrishirst, 16 November 2014 - 12:15 PM.


#2 chrishirst

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Posted 16 November 2014 - 12:17 PM

It takes time and real promotion work for that to happen.


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#3 nickh

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Posted 16 November 2014 - 12:27 PM

Hi.

 

Well the site has been live for about 5 months now and we've seen very little increase in CTR and impressions (according to GA).  Surely this is more than enough time to see it within the top 10 search result pages?!

 

What do you mean by "real" promotion work?  From a technical stand point, the code appears to be good (Webmaster Tools is happy anyway!), the content on each page is relevant, and the site's architecture/infrastructure is logical.

 

Additionally, I've created (and linked) Google+, Facebook and LinkedIn profiles, so I'm running out of ideas...



#4 chrishirst

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Posted 16 November 2014 - 05:32 PM

Surely this is more than enough time to see it within the top 10 search result pages?!

Nope. Especially if you are not actively promoting the URLs.
 

From a technical stand point, the code appears to be good (Webmaster Tools is happy anyway!), the content on each page is relevant, and the site's architecture/infrastructure is logical.

You could have THE most technically perfect 'architecture' possible, it doesn't mean that search engines have to show your URLs in their results.
 

Additionally, I've created (and linked) Google+, Facebook and LinkedIn profiles, so I'm running out of ideas...

Does your target audience frequent such places?

 

Start reading here http://www.highranki...s-for-new-seos/
 



#5 nickh

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Posted 17 November 2014 - 05:37 AM

Thanks for your reply, but it doesn't really help me.

 

I've read through the articles in the link which you provided (although most are dated pre-2008...!), and they all suggest the same thing - content is king, but following semantic rules and structuring a site well (as I believe I have done) is also important.  In none of those articles does it mention the need to "promote URLs" (presumably you mean via social media?), and I know of many other sites that rank well with Google without ANY blogging or support of accounts on Facebook, Google+, Pinterest, etc (all of which my site currently has anyway!).

 

With so few page impressions recorded in GA, I'm of the impression that I've entirely missed something that will suddenly open it up to the world.  Don't get me wrong - I'm not expecting it to miraculously appear at the top of page 1, but when I have manually gone through ALL search result pages and it isn't listed at all, this implies that I've missed something big.

 

And yes - my target audience do use some (if not all) of the social media channels.  In fact, a recent sale was generated off the back of a visit to the site...but only because they found it directly on LinkedIn - because they certainly didn't do so via a Google search!

 

Any specific help would be hugely appreciated here...



#6 chrishirst

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Posted 17 November 2014 - 11:41 AM

 

but when I have manually gone through ALL search result pages and it isn't listed at all, this implies that I've missed something big.

Yes;

 

 

And this;

 

In fact, a recent sale was generated off the back of a visit to the site...but only because they found it directly on LinkedIn -

 is telling you the 'something big' that you are missing.

 

Hopefully it SHOULD be showing you that Google isn't the be all and end all and what you SHOULD be doing is getting "out there" and telling people about what your Internet presence can do for them. This does not mean "link building" for a single URL, it means telling people about the page (URL) on your site that is RELATED not relevant to them and their needs

 

(although most are dated pre-2008...!),

 

Good information doesn't go out of date. Search engines haven't changed what they want since 1995, and what end users of Search want has NEVER changed since search engines first appeared on the internet.

 

Promotion is exactly what the dictionary explains it as, in both meanings of the word. You start telling people about the things you do, they tell other people about what you do, Google finds out that real people are talking about what you do, then they join in the fun and games.

But without that initial push, it is not going to get started. Simply 'being there' is not enough.



#7 nickh

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Posted 17 November 2014 - 12:36 PM

Once again I appreciate your input, but I think we're getting our wires crossed here;  I'm simply interested in improving SEO from a technical perspective.  The marketing and publicity are being taken care of (and have been doing so for over a year, in the run up to the new site launch) by other members of the company.  I think it's unrealistic to think that every company which has ever appeared in a Google result has got there because people are writing on forums and creating blogs to discuss them.

 

One specific search term does actually produce results (and puts the site on the first result page) - BUT only references one specific area of the site.  This fact alone surely proves that the issue is one of a technical nature...



#8 Jill

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Posted 17 November 2014 - 02:23 PM

Did you check out the article is this category:

http://www.highranki...ecture-articles


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#9 chrishirst

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Posted 17 November 2014 - 02:23 PM

 

 I'm simply interested in improving SEO from a technical perspective.

 

There ISN'T one. Search engines spend a lot of money on salaries employing some of the finest software engineers on the Planet who spend their time making sure that 'something technical' CANNOT make more than a small impact for a limited period on the search results.

 

And you need stop looking at 'rankings' and thinking it tells you something useful. Only YOU see the 'rankings' that you see, nobody else does.



#10 nickh

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Posted 17 November 2014 - 02:59 PM

Did you check out the article is this category:

http://www.highranki...ecture-articles

 

Thanks Jill - the is the sort of thing I'm looking for, but I feel like I've followed these guidelines and still failing to generate more than, say, 10 page impressions per day!  If I were to PM you the URL, would you mind casting your eye over it to see if I've made any glaringly obviously errors?

 

 

There ISN'T one. Search engines spend a lot of money on salaries employing some of the finest software engineers on the Planet who spend their time making sure that 'something technical' CANNOT make more than a small impact for a limited period on the search results.

 

And you need stop looking at 'rankings' and thinking it tells you something useful. Only YOU see the 'rankings' that you see, nobody else does.

 

Chris, this snippet was taken from one of [url=http://www.highrankings.com/seo-articles]Jill's articles[/url]:

 

Fix technical issues first and foremost

Technical issues affecting SEO have always existed and smart SEO consultants have always made fixing them a high priority. But after Panda and Penguin, fixing them is more important than ever.

 

 

I respect that you almost certainly know more about SEO than I do, but doesn't the above completely contradict what you were saying about "URL promotion"?  And if not, then surely "SEO consultants" are simply tasked with the generation of inbound links (presumably simply via social media and/or blogging)...?!



#11 chrishirst

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Posted 18 November 2014 - 05:14 AM

Fixing "technical problems" is totally different to finding "technical ways of improving" and provided your site content can be accessed by SE bots at only one URL per document, that's the technical stuff pretty much sorted.

 

 

And if not, then surely "SEO consultants" are simply tasked with the generation of inbound links (presumably simply via social media and/or blogging)...?!

Only the clueless one's.

 

The simple fact is that it is a relatively new site, and regardless of the redirects it will take time. Your comment regarding the original site being 'basic' also implies that very little time and effort was spent promoting it and it was there because "everybody has one". If that IS the case, you have a fair amount of work to do.

Getting referrals from Search alone should NOT your initial goal because it simply will not happen, getting that takes time and patience.



#12 nickh

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Posted 18 November 2014 - 09:06 AM

Fixing "technical problems" is totally different to finding "technical ways of improving" and provided your site content can be accessed by SE bots at only one URL per document, that's the technical stuff pretty much sorted.

 

Aren't we just splitting hairs here?  And if not, then what do you define as "technical ways of improving"?  If search engines are only returning results for a single page (regardless of other page content), then should I not be trying to figure out the SEO issues on these pages, rather than just plugging URLs to promote SE results?

 

 

The simple fact is that it is a relatively new site, and regardless of the redirects it will take time.

 

Well, it's relatively new when compared to, say, eBay!...But I would have expected results after around 3 months, yet it has now been 5/6 and I still see nothing...

 

 

Your comment regarding the original site being 'basic' also implies that very little time and effort was spent promoting it and it was there because "everybody has one". If that IS the case, you have a fair amount of work to do.

 

OK, so what exactly is the work that is still to do?...Spamming links on blogs and FB, etc?!



#13 Jill

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Posted 18 November 2014 - 09:49 AM

Your site is still way new.

 

Have you read this pinned post of mine:

http://www.highranki...-not-on-google/



#14 nickh

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Posted 22 November 2014 - 04:26 AM

Thanks Jill - great post.  It's interesting that site visits only doubled with the latest Google update.

 

You mentioned that your site was initially struggling, with (presumably) 30 visits per day.  But in contrast, my site is currently receiving between 0 and 3 clicks per day...!  :(

 

The nature of the website's business sector (exhibition stands) is not really something that you can plug on social media (since it's entirely B2B), yet there are many other exhibition companies that are listed in Google's search results (many with what I would consider to have far inferior websites - both in semantic structure and content).  Is there anything more that I (solely as a web developer) can do to help the situation?



#15 chrishirst

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Posted 22 November 2014 - 08:27 AM

 

that you can plug on social media (since it's entirely B2B)

Business people use "social media", YOU have to pick the ones that they use.

 

It's ALL down to the first rule of marketing.

 

"Know your audience"






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