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Facebook Ate My Website


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12 replies to this topic

#1 thx1138

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 07:00 AM

Is it just me or is it increasingly difficult to get people to view content outside of Facebook?

 

I wrote a blog post about it, not sure if I'm allowed to link to it?



#2 Jill

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 07:25 AM

Depends on the content. 



#3 thx1138

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 07:38 AM

Jill, I'll link to it and you can remove it if necessary.

 

Facebook ate my website



#4 Mikl

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 08:20 AM

I wrote a blog post about it.

 

I read your blog post. It contains some colourful language and analogy. But it doesn't tell me exactly how Facebook is eating your site.

 

Are you saying people are no longer visiting your site because they are spending all their time in Facebook? If that's so, maybe that's because they are finding content on FB that is more interesting than what they could find on your site. So the answer is to make your site more attractive to your target audience, with content that is relevant and up to date - something that will actually make them want to visit your site.

 

Or, could it just possibly be that your traffic has gone down for whatever reason, and you are looking for someone to blame?

 

Mike



#5 Jill

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 09:46 AM

I'm with mike, I don't really get what the problem is. Facebook is actually a great marketing device to let people who hang there no about your site. As long as you have followers who are interested in what's at your site, if you continue to let them know about each bit of new content, they will come to check it out. 

 

At at least that's been my experience. 

 

Now if your talking about a forum site, I can see how FB could take a bite out of your traffic as the conversation may instead be taking place there. But even then it doesn't have to be that way. 



#6 thx1138

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 09:58 AM

The point I was trying to make is that people in my experience seem to be increasingly reluctant to leave Facebook to view content, they want it there in front of them within Facebook.

 

Therefore if more and more content ends up on Facebook, where by the way you give up your rights to it, then Facebook is essentially eating the Internet.

 

Of coure everyone will have different experiences and it may depend on the type of content you are creating.


 

Or, could it just possibly be that your traffic has gone down for whatever reason, and you are looking for someone to blame?

 

No, that's not it at all.



#7 thx1138

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 10:19 AM

Perhaps an example.  Some months ago I created a post, not incidentally on the website linked above.  It centred around an old black and white photograph that I'd found of a number of characters from my home town.

 

I spent some weeks researching and finding out who the characters were, what they did in the town, when they died and so on.  I also got in contact with my uncle who was able to furnish me with a good yarn in which many of the characters featured.

 

I scanned in the photograph, cleaned it up, labelled it and created a unique post about it with all the information I'd researched.

 

I linked to this from various sources including a related historical page on Facebook.  It generated some interest, a few comments, a bit of buzz.

 

Then a few days later, I noticed to my horror that someone had taken the entire post and picture and copied and pasted them to the above mentioned Facebook page.

 

The response was extraordinary, loads of comments and likes, lots of sharing and perhaps most irritatingly lots of back slaps for the chap that had stolen it from our site.


Edited by thx1138, 21 January 2014 - 10:21 AM.


#8 Jill

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 10:35 AM

Well, not sure what you can do about the stealing of content (other than contact the chap). 

But it sounds like perhaps that the people who you reach on Facebook simply weren't interested in your post (wrong target market?), but the people who that thief reaches are. (Maybe? Hard to say.)



#9 Michael Martinez

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 10:39 AM

People will leave Facebook if they find the content interesting enough. One of my sites recently received thousands of visits from Facebook over a movie review. We didn't expect that. It wasn't the most spectacular review our guy had ever written.

I have other sites that receive Facebook traffic quite often, it comes and goes. You just have to produce something that resonates with the people you are reaching through Facebook.

#10 torka

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 10:51 AM

That isn't so much a Facebook problem as it is a copyright violation problem. Facebook didn't steal your article, a copyright thief did. The fact he used Facebook to post the stolen material doesn't matter -- if he hadn't posted it there, he would have posted it somewhere else. Copyright thieves simply use whatever platform is available and popular.

 

If he really liked the article and wanted to make sure people saw it, he could simply have posted a link to your article along with a comment encouraging his followers to read this fantastic article. Facebook didn't wrong you, the copyright thief did. Blaming Facebook for his having stolen your material is along the same lines as blaming the highway system because your car got stolen.

 

Have you contacted Facebook to let them know the material is stolen? (Here's how.) They'll remove the article from his account, and if it turns out he's a repeat offender, he may get his account suspended, too.

 

--Torka :oldfogey:



#11 thx1138

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 11:49 AM

Ok, clearly I'm not articulating myself properly.  I post a link on a Facebook page to content outside of Facebook, it creates some interest, some people come from Facebook to view it.

 

Exactly the same content is posted in exactly the same place on Facebook but in its entirety and creates a great deal more interest.

 

Therefore the people of Facebook were very interested in the content but were more likely to read and share it when it was on Facebook.

 

Torka, I requested that the creator of the page remove the content and they did.


Edited by thx1138, 21 January 2014 - 11:52 AM.


#12 chrishirst

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 01:17 PM

It's just the evolution of the Internet.

 

First there were Bulletin Boards and "@News Groups" (Web 0.9), that evolved into the likes of Tripod, GeoCities, and 'Front Page' websites (v1.0), then discussion forums, commercial sites etc exploded into life, now along comes the big bad comet of "web 2.0" in the shape of personal blogs, "social networking" etc. etc, and the dinosaurs of forums, single topic websites suddenly find that their environment is polluted and their prey (the punters) are now feeding elsewhere.

 

So the solution is very simple, you have to go where your prey is.



#13 Jill

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 02:34 PM

Ok, clearly I'm not articulating myself properly.  I post a link on a Facebook page to content outside of Facebook, it creates some interest, some people come from Facebook to view it.

 

Exactly the same content is posted in exactly the same place on Facebook but in its entirety and creates a great deal more interest.

 

 

But the point is that presumably you and the thief have a different set of followers. 

 

It sounds to me not so much that FB itself is your problem, but the friends that you have there. If they're not your target audience, then of course they're not going to click.

 

For example, most of my FB "friends" are interested in SEO. But now I don't talk about SEO anymore and instead I post pictures of my healthy lunches and links to my new blog about my new healthy lifestyle. While some of those who are interested in SEO are also interested in what I cooked for dinner, it's a much smaller percentage of those who were interested in the posts I used to point them to that were about SEO.

 

I used to have hundreds of FB friends who would click to any mention of a new SEO post on my site. Whereas my current mentions having to do with my healthy lifestyle might get 5 (on a good day!).

The problem for me is certainly not Facebook. It's just that I need a new set of FB friends who are interested in the new things that I'm interested in. (This is all on my list of things to figure out how to go about doing at some point.) It sounds to me like you might be in a similar boat. 






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