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Partial Redirection - Need Help Urgently


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12 replies to this topic

#1 rockstart

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Posted 11 December 2013 - 06:39 AM

We have a website www.abc.com. In this domain, we have many categories and relevant sub categories. Under this we have a category XYZ. There will be sub categories, viz. DEF, GHI, JKL, MNO, etc.

Now, we registered a new domain, viz., Example Domain. We wish to keep all the contents in the old domain; but wish to move a particular category, VIZ., XYZ, to the new website. Hence, we propose after reaching www.abc.com, if we click XYZ, it would be redirecting to new domain, viz., Example Domain.

Is this the best practice from the perspective of SEO.

Look forward to your answers.

 



#2 Alan Perkins

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Posted 11 December 2013 - 11:10 AM

Yes, set up a HTTP 301 redirect from www.abc.com/XYZ/ to Example Domain.



#3 torka

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Posted 11 December 2013 - 11:13 AM

I assume you have a good business reason for making the change and aren't simply doing it because you think it might bring some SEO benefit.

 

As Alan says, put in place 301 redirects from the old XYZ category pages on the abc.com domain to the corresponding new pages on the "example domain" and you should be fine.

 

My own company's website has for many years been made up of three different domains stitched together in pretty much the same manner as you propose to join your abc.com and "example domain," with no apparent issues.

 

My :02:

 

--Torka :oldfogey:



#4 qwerty

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Posted 11 December 2013 - 11:32 AM

It's also a good idea to update your internal links so they'll point directly to the new site rather than relying on the redirect. The redirect will cover any links you can't change yourself.



#5 rockstart

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Posted 12 December 2013 - 05:48 AM

I have confused a bit. We want to have two domains. One is our old domain (the existing one). The other is the new domain.  There are two categories, viz., XYZ and ABC. Both these categories will be visible in both the domains. But physically XYZ will be available only in the old domain and ABC will be available only in the new domain.

 

It means if the visitors are in the old domain, they can still visualize and click ABC; but when they click the ABC category, they will be redirected to the new domain and vice versa.

 

Is this an SEO friendly solution. I need help in this.

 

The reason why we want to keep the old domain is that we already have some traffic to the website, which we don't want to loose.

 

I request help in coming out of this dilemma.



#6 torka

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Posted 12 December 2013 - 10:03 AM

I'm not sure why you're confused. I believe I understood what you were saying the first time, and I told you that is exactly the situation that exists with my company's website.

 

To expand on my original explanation: our main website is www.company.com. When you click on the "support" link in our main menu (no matter what page you're on, anywhere on the site), you will go to support.company.com. When you click on the "products" link in our main menu (no matter what page you're on, anywhere in the site), you will go to www.companystore.com. When you click on the "home" link in our main menu (no matter what page you're on, anywhere in the site), you will go to www.company.com.

 

In other words, we have a single site, but it's made up of three domains. We're totally above board about it -- we have never tried to conceal from the search engines that these are different domains. And for 10 years now, through all the updates and algorithm changes, we have had no perceptible SEO issues at all. Not even a glitch. (Knock wood.)

 

All pages have a similar look and feel and all use an identical main menu in order to make for a better visitor experience, but they don't have to. That's simply a design decision we made. I have created different sidebar submenus for different areas of the site to help users more easily navigate to where they need to go, and depending on the content, pages may have slightly different layouts, so it's not necessary for every page to be identical to every other, even within a similar design theme.

 

As I, Alan and qwerty have all said, simply 301 redirect the old pages to the new, and update your menu and internal links so they point to the new pages. There is no "SEO dilemma" that you need to address.

 

I thought our original comments made all that clear. What specifically are you still worried about? Perhaps if you tell us a bit more about what "dilemma" you think you're facing, we can more fully address your concerns.

 

--Torka :oldfogey:


Edited by torka, 12 December 2013 - 10:05 AM.


#7 chrishirst

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Posted 12 December 2013 - 10:27 AM

Google's definition of a "website" is:

"A collection of individual URLs connected by a common navigational structure"


NOT "A collection of URLs connected by a domain name"

#8 rockstart

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Posted 12 December 2013 - 11:53 AM

This clearly explains. But still there is a doubt. In the example given by Babe, she has one domain for store, another domain for the other purpose. But for my website, we wishh to keep the existing products in the old domain and the future products in the new domain. Is this also okay. chrishirst - Great Explanation. Thanks

#9 qwerty

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Posted 12 December 2013 - 12:50 PM

It doesn't really matter what criteria you choose for moving content, products, or whatever to a different URL, as long as you're consistent, you provide a good user experience, and you get all the technical details covered correctly. So if the fact that Torka's (aka "Babe's") company chooses to divide company information, support, and products into separate sites, and you want to split different types of products into different sites (something an old client of mine is planning to do soon too), that shouldn't mean that Torka's answer to your question doesn't apply.

 

How about this: why don't you tell us exactly why you want to move this particular category of products to a new domain. Is it because you feel the domain name will help with branding those products? Do you believe there's a different customer type for them? And while we're at it, Torka can tell us why her company chose to break things up into different domains and subdomains. That should give us some insight into why one would do this. After all, it can be a lot of work to make this happen.

 

My personal preference would be to keep everything on a single domain, although I might break up content by subdomain. That's what I've been advising that client I mentioned to do. So getting details from you and Torka would be helpful to me, and maybe to you and others reading this thread.



#10 torka

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Posted 13 December 2013 - 10:21 AM

I can only speculate why the main body of the site and the support area were set up separately, as that happened before I came on board.

 

I think it was because the main part of the site was being maintained by an outside company (I was the first in-house webmaster here), while the support area was running on a custom content management system that had been developed by an in-house programmer. This was 10+ years ago, before everybody started using WordPress for everything.

 

So, initially I think it was simply done for ease of administration. With everything already in place and no compelling reason to change, it has simply stayed that way over the years.

 

It actually has worked out to our benefit from time to time -- for instance, when the "main" section of the site was hacked recently, the support area and the "store" were both unaffected and continued to operate without a hitch. We actually made a bunch of sales while the main part of the site was still messed up, because the store pages show up well in search results and the store was fully functional. :)

 

As to why the store is separated, again that was for site administration reasons.

 

At the time, the main and support sections of the site were hosted on a server sitting in a closet in our building. Management's original plan had been to run the store off the same server. Both the IT manager and I were adamant that we were not equipped to run an ecommerce site in-house. We don't have a true "data center" (no redundancy, no back up generator, etc.) nor are we staffed with security experts, nor are we open 24 hours a day -- storing credit card information locally would essentially paint a big ol' target on the side of our building and we'd be leaving the place unguarded every night, weekend and holiday. Software security can only get you so far. You need people watching, too. :eek:

 

So we insisted that the store be externally hosted. :gavel:

 

We could have done it with a subdomain, of course, and I honestly don't remember why we decided to go with a separate domain instead, but either way the effect would have been the same. The store was originally hosted externally in a secure datacenter, while the rest of the site was hosted internally. And the store was running a completely separate stand-alone ecommerce/store/cart software that has nothing to do with the software serving up the rest of the site.

 

Eventually, of course, I migrated all our websites to the external host, so we don't run any internal web server any more. But each domain sits on its own independent software. In some cases, individual pages within a domain are running their own separate scripts. It works with our business organization -- making it easier for me to grant access to other employees only to those sections of the site they need, and to keep them out of areas they shouldn't be messing with. It allows me to offer better-quality functionality to our visitors. (I can select a script based on it's individual features and quality, rather than having to settle for what's available as an add-on to an existing content management system.) Otherwise, we'd need a custom-written CMS.

 

It sounds complicated when I describe it, but once one sees it in action, one comes to understand it actually makes pretty good sense from a business management point of view -- and it's a lot easier to administer than it might seem at first glance. :theswim:

 

And qwerty is right -- it doesn't matter how you divide up the site. It's OK to split things up however you want. In fact, you could put every page of your site on a different domain if you wanted to. Personally, I think that would be weird, and it would almost certainly be an administrative nightmare, but if you could if you wanted to. :dntknw:

 

--Torka :oldfogey:



#11 rockstart

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 04:50 AM

Sorry. I was away. That is the reason why I was not able to respond.

 

Thanks for all your reply. Now, we have decided to keep a separate domain based on the contents. Let me tell you the reason.

 

Ours is an ecommerce website. All our products are pink in color. People call them girly colors. We wish to cater to the needs of both men and women. This will help us in scaling also. Many men prefer not to buy. This is the reason why we are willing to move products which are not pink to another domain.

 

Thanks for all your help.



#12 Michael Martinez

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 11:44 AM

Actually, that kind of makes sense to me.

#13 chrishirst

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 12:07 PM

Absolutely.

 

"Know your audience and what they want (or need)"

 

This is the reason why we are willing to move products which are not pink to another domain.

 

Which is real optimisation because it will, or should, have an effect on the 'bottom line'






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