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I Need To Add About 100 301's - Does That Slow The Site Down?


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4 replies to this topic

#1 lister

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 11:49 AM

Am deciding if it is not better just to 404 them instead...

IMO as long as the pages are not indexed very well SE's don't care too much about 404 -

These pages in questions don't rank that well...

My question is - adding about 100 301's doesn't have a major impact on site loading speed - right?



#2 chrishirst

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 12:35 PM

My question is - adding about 100 301's doesn't have a major impact on site loading speed - right?

Assuming you mean 100 different URLs being redirected rather that one url being redirected 100 times.

 

No, it will have no discernable effect at all.

 

 

SE's don't care too much about 404 -

 

Search engines do not care AT ALL about URLs that result in a 404 response.  Full Stop (for the US read period).

 

404 errors are like poo.gif .... it just happens,

 

There are no negative effects for ducuments that have been removed from a website.

 

 



#3 lister

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 01:12 PM


Search engines do not care AT ALL about URLs that result in a 404 response.  Full Stop (for the US read period).

 

404 errors are like poo.gif .... it just happens,

 

There are no negative effects for ducuments that have been removed from a website.

 

> yeah, that's what I thought....b/c content can be removed due to so many real reasons - i.e. out of date, no longer relevant etc etc


Edited by lister, 05 December 2013 - 01:13 PM.


#4 qwerty

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 01:24 PM

However...

 

If the URLs that 404 have backlinks pointing to them, then redirecting to a relevant, live page will both provide a better user experience for the people who click those links and send the link equity to the live page.

 

On top of that, I have issues with the way Google treats 404s: they don't stop checking on them. You would think they would view it as a waste of their resources to keep requesting a URL after it's consistently returned a 404 for some amount of time, but they don't. They may not check them often, but they keep checking them. So if your site has a crawl quota of 1000 URLs, but you've got many more pages than that and want them all crawled regularly, then the fact that Googlebot is wasting time requesting pages that haven't existed for some time means that some pages that could get crawled more often don't.

 

I know, I'm being petty :) The pages that don't get crawled today because Google wanted to check on a 404 will get crawled tomorrow or the next day. But I'd rather just deal with it and get them to forget about those old URLs.



#5 Michael Martinez

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 04:50 PM

It really depends on how you manage the 301 redirects. 100 is pretty insignificant but if you're talking about a high-traffic Website and you're using an .htaccess solution for the redirects, it does have an impact over time. The .htaccess file is processed by your Web server for every fetch -- every image, script, text file, HTML page, Web page URL, etc. -- and it makes a difference if 100,000 people a day visit your site versus 100 people a day.

It can also have an impact on a low-traffic site that is on a shared-hosting server, because up to several hundred other Websites may be on that server. The less work the server has to do to serve one of your Web documents, the better.

Finally, even if you can justify adding 100 redirects today, going forward you may fall back on that as a solution for many other URLs -- and eventually you have a huge .htaccess file. I always recommend reviewing 301 redirects on an annual basis and removing any from .htaccess that are not being serviced any more.




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