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Does Global Bounce Rate Affect Local Search Credibility?


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24 replies to this topic

#16 lesterj1

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 01:39 PM

Actually, no they don't, all they can tell is that a particular cookie ID,  clicked on more than one result. The "back button" sends no signals to the server so there is no "bounce" that is ever recorded. It's difficult for anyone, even Google, to make a judgement on information that they don't actually have or ever get.

 

Google can track this.  They don't call it bounce back, they refer it is short clicks and long clicks.  A short click is when someone clicks on a search result and then clicks back to the search results page very quickly, whereas a long click is when someone clicks on a search result and then does not come back to the search results either ever or at least for a long time (not sure their definition of a long time.)

 

If memory serves it was described in "Plex" and several other places.



#17 Michael Martinez

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 04:46 PM

Google can track this.  They don't call it bounce back, they refer it is short clicks and long clicks.  A short click is when someone clicks on a search result and then clicks back to the search results page very quickly, whereas a long click is when someone clicks on a search result and then does not come back to the search results either ever or at least for a long time (not sure their definition of a long time.)
 
If memory serves it was described in "Plex" and several other places.


Google can SOMETIMES track this.

#18 Andy1342

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 05:05 PM

Thanks Jill.

 

The pages are genuine, there is some slight overlap because eg  it is hard to write 70 different calls to action at the bottom of the pages but I can't think that is a big deal.

 

The links were weak, almost all reciprocal links with people doing my work in other cities or directories. However, when I look at my leading competitor for "Myproduct Mytown", their links look pretty similar.  I have a few very cheap and nasty directory links from an ill-advised SEO venture but again, hard to think that is a big deal.

 

I do have two victorian books which I scanned and uploaded. When I did that they were unique on the internet, since then they have appeared on archive.org but assuming first one up gets to own things, that also should not be a problem.

 

 I am not totally impressed by my new website designers (many bugs, little testing) though it must be said they are an obviously-bright team of  hi-tech enthusiasts with a good reputation. They reckon the incoming links are not the problem; but what is?

 

Nothing on your list of 18 killer no-nos obviously rings a bell and the site has always been designed to be white hat. And oddly, a few of my pages still do really well.

 

Any suggestions for what specifically I should look at and compare with my competitor's sites?

 

Many thanks

 

Andy



#19 chrishirst

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 11:09 AM

Any suggestions for what specifically I should look at and compare with my competitor's sites?

 

Absolutely nothing at all.



#20 Andy1342

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Posted 09 November 2013 - 10:41 AM

>>> Absolutely nothing at all.

 

Paint me in a simple-minded if you will, but it looks like this to me:

Site A (mine) and sites B, C, D are basically similar small local sites relying on basically similar reciprocal links.

Site A crashes out with P&P. The others don't.

 

So, if I look at differences in terms of keyword count, what they look like to the adwords inspection tool, number and type of links etc, I might learn something interesting. Why not? If so, what are the most useful comparisons to make to avoid a random trawling expedition?



#21 chrishirst

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Posted 09 November 2013 - 11:27 AM

But HOW do you know if your 'competitors' are doing things better than you??

 

I'm sure they aren't sharing traffic data and conversion rates with you.

 

 

And PLEASE don't say "rankings"!!!

 

By the way, what has Postage and Packing (P&P) got to do anything????

 

And Yes I am being facetious.

 

 

So, if I look at differences in terms of keyword count, what they look like to the adwords inspection tool, number and type of links etc, I might learn something interesting.

 

More likely you won't, and how do you know they haven't copied someone else who may have been just as clueless??

 

And if you copy whatever the "competitors" are you are STILL going to be behind the ball.



#22 torka

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 09:25 AM

Frankly, when it comes to content, your best bet is actually to listen to your customers more than your competitors.

 

Find out both the words your customers use to describe whatever it is you offer, and the phrases they use to describe the problem(s) your offering solves, Use those words and phrases in your site content and copy.

 

Find out what their pain points are, and demonstrate how what you offer can make their life easier.

 

Find out what is keeping them from pressing that "add to cart" button, and answer their objections.

 

When you talk about benefits, back each one up with one or more specific features that make that benefit happen.

 

When you talk about how good your offering is, back that up with case studies and testimonials from actual customers.

 

Make your site as easy and intuitive to navigate as possible. Make sure your most important pages are the most prominently featured in both your menus and your on-page links. Keep in mind that visitors can enter your site on any page, not just the home page, so make it easy for them to "get their bearings" and figure out where to go next. Include prominent calls to action on every page.

 

If you're going to review your competitors' sites for content, they can potentially help in sparking inspiration for topics to cover. They might be using a descriptive phrase you'd overlooked, or pointing out a benefit you hadn't considered, or documenting a use for your product that you hadn't thought of. You don't want to copy what they're doing -- because you really don't know if what they're doing is working or not -- just take a look to see if you can glean any usable ideas you can test out for yourself.

 

Also, if you're going to review their links, it's not about "how many" or "what type." What you want to look for are specific links from good, reputable sources -- editorial links (that is, links that somebody else gave them, not links they "built" themselves). If they have any from sources that don't link to you, find out how they got those links. Did they join an association? Submit an article to a magazine? Get interviewed by the local newspaper? Submit their product for benchmarking? Donate to or participate in a charity event? Work out a co-op deal with other related (non-competitor) businesses?

 

Whatever they did to get those good editorial links, start doing the same kinds of things yourself. Eventually you, too, will have a reasonable number of good, editorial links yourself. Yes, it will take some effort, but it will be worth it in the end. Anything worth having is worth working for.

 

My :02:

 

--Torka :oldfogey:


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#23 Mikl

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 08:51 AM

 

Google can track this.  They don't call it bounce back, they refer it is short clicks and long clicks.  A short click is when someone clicks on a search result and then clicks back to the search results page very quickly, whereas a long click is when someone clicks on a search result and then does not come back to the search results either ever or at least for a long time (not sure their definition of a long time.)

 

But what's that supposed to prove?

 

I don't know about you, but when I'm researching a particular subject, I bring up the SERPs page, scan it to look for likely sites of interest, and then click on the promising links to open each of the target sites in a new browser tab. I might do that for five or six sites within a few seconds of each other. I then peruse each of the resulting sites in turn, spending perhaps many minutes on some of them.

 

According to you, Google would see the last site that I clicked on as having a zero bounce rate, and all the others as bouncing immediately. Neither conclusion is necessarily correct.

 

Am I unusual in using Google in that way? Or - more likely - is this method of calculating bounce rates just as misleading as some of the others?

 

Mike



#24 lesterj1

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 10:58 AM

I do the same thing when I search.  So, I don't think it's unusual...or we're both unusual :)

 

I'm not arguing that bounce backs or long and short clicks or whatever we call them are a great signal.  I'm simply saying the Google has said that they do track that and they do use that information.  I agree that there are a lot of weaknesses to the signal, and I know it's just one of many Google uses.  Truthfully, I don't really care to spend the time trying to figure out exactly how Google would work through all possible false signals etc. to create a usable signal. I'm content to accept that they say they track and use it as a signal along with many others.  I'd assume that it's probably one of the less impactful signals they use.



#25 Michael Martinez

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Posted 18 November 2013 - 02:39 PM

Google's evaluation of user behavior in their search results is not directly tied to their evaluation of individual Websites. They have said as much repeatedly many times through the years.

People are confusing how Google measures the quality of a SERP with how it measures the quality of a Website and those are two very, very different things.




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