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Now Working At An Agency - Need Advice


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6 replies to this topic

#1 Graham

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 05:32 AM

Hi all

 

I'm new on here. I've done my own affiliate marketing for a good while but I've now been asked to start at an agency.  The agency is small and has mainly done web design and outsourced all of their SEO previously.  Their client sites were all bitten by Hummingbird because of crappy link building so they've asked me to come in full time and take it over.  I'm the only Internet Marketer in the company.  

 

As I've said in my intro post in the pub I'm sure I can contribute with my affiliate experiences to this forum but I also would like to get advice from people already working at agencies or as freelancers.

 

I'll admit I'm struggling a little bit to make the conversion to working for other clients but would really like to stick at it as I've made a career switch from IT and have wanted to do Internet Marketing full time for ages.

 

My main concerns are:

 

1) Writing for clients who won't engage socially, won't pay for it and don't like their website to be updated and sell boring stuff with little or no online community.  

 

2) Time management.  Trying to fit it all in and give each client a fair (and paid for) time slice.

 

3)  Official representation of my clients.  Basically, do you guys do this or not?

 

Up until now I've spent time making technical on page SEO corrections and checking out competitors, obtaining their links etc.  I've also been engaging socially to try and create brand awareness on my clients behalf.

 

I'd really like to be creating useful content directly on the clients sites but there are so many that I'm no expert on the subject and so a lot of my time is spent on research.  I've currently got 11 clients and it's difficult to take it all in, so my time is spent analyzing current news and events and trying to engage in that area.  I'm sure over time I'll become more knowledgeable on my clients subjects but what am I missing a trick here? 

 

Any advice or thoughts would be gratefully received.

 

Cheers

 

Graham



#2 chrishirst

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 10:22 AM

Writing for clients who won't engage socially,

 

And would their particular market segment benefit from "social engagement"

 

won't pay for it and don't like their website to be updated

 

So why are they paying for agency involvement then?

 

sell boring stuff with little or no online community. 

 

So the answer to question one  is ...  "No they wouldn't"

 

 

2) Time management.  Trying to fit it all in and give each client a fair (and paid for) time slice.

 

Forget " equal time slicing" break your time and effort up into clients and markets where you can have a real effect, that way the work splits reasonably naturally, as you waste less time fiddling about with the ones that are "lost causes"



#3 Graham

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 12:52 PM

Thanks for your reply.  I've always engaged socially for my own sites because it has been a great source of traffic.  My thinking is that even when considering clients who don't have a strong online community, I believe the signal it creates is a strong SEO weighting factor, it's just a shame there's not much going on, either that or I'm missing something.  There's a white board Friday post on moz.com about this http://moz.com/blog/...iteboard-friday so to my mind it should be done anyway.  Maybe this is the wrong kind of thinking, I'm not sure.  I'm new to agency work, please forgive me!

 

The clients are paying for rankings.  Simple as that.  I've talked to my boss about traffic that converts to sales should be a better metric to report each month but he has traditionally reported on rankings and this is what they pay him for.  I kind of feel like I'm answering my own question here...I just know I've got a real job on to turn the ship around.  

 

I can't ignore the lost causes unfortunately as I can't pick and choose the clients, not at this point anyway.  

 

Thanks again.



#4 chrishirst

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 05:59 PM

The clients are paying for rankings

 

Then you have idiots for clients!

 

but he has traditionally reported on rankings and this is what they pay him for

 

And for a boss!



#5 Graham

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 06:04 PM

Haha Love it!



#6 torka

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 10:06 AM

Maybe instead of getting them to drop reporting and focusing on rankings, you can get them to add reporting about conversions to their current reports?

 

Think of it like a baby playing with something that's probably not a good toy for them (say, the TV remote, or a fragile collectible). If you try to snatch it away, even if you tell them you've got something better for them, the baby will protest, and probably cling even tighter to the thing. But if you show them a colorful, age-appropriate toy, demonstrate how much fun it is to play with, they may well let go of the inappropriate thing all on their own. At the very least, they won't complain much when you start moving the delicate item out of reach. They'll be too busy having fun with the "new" toy.

 

So, demonstrate for them in a tangible way how conversions are being impacted by your efforts, and it may become easier to phase out rankings reports. Or at least decrease their importance, to both your boss and your clients. Working at an agency (or in any consultative capacity), you may have to spend as much time -- at least initially -- marketing your own good ideas as you do marketing your clients' businesses.

 

Also, social is cool, but don't neglect the old-school digital marketing tactics. I'm in-house these days, not agency, but I work for a company that sells fairly "un-sexy" products, basically 100% B2B. We have a social media presence, but I don't spend a lot of time on it, because our audience mostly isn't there. I don't ignore it entirely, of course, by it's not my primary focus. Where I get the biggest bang for my buck is from our good old-fashioned email customer newsletter. I know the subscribers to our newsletter are engaged and interested in what we offer, so when I give them a special subscriber-only discount or free shipping offer or whatever, I can count on making sales.

 

My :02:

 

--Torka :oldfogey:



#7 Graham

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 03:09 PM

I'll take those 2 cents thanks.  I think I'm gonna stick to my guns and go with your advice, I know it's the right thing to do and the more opinions I'm getting is just confirming it.  Cheers.






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