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Your Niche Keywords; Knowing Which Ones To Use


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#1 seocoffee

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 04:07 PM

So i am over in Google Adwords, and i am plugging in the obvious keywords for niche, however I am somewhat confused on which keywords I really should use.

I see ad group (by relevance), Keywords, Avg monthly searches, Competition, Avg CPC, and Ad impression share.

 

The first thing I do is i type in the root word  for my niche and run the get ideas button.

 

It comes back with Avg monthly searches of 310,440, Competition High, Avg CPC $7.23 and Ad Impression share is 0.

 

Next to add what "type" I am in the niche I type in a single word in front of the root word that describes what type I am 

in this niche. This is what i get back

 

It comes back with Avg Monthly Searches of 155,570, Competition High, Avg CPC $13.00 and Ad Impression share is 0

 

Next I type in the location  of where i am behind the root word.

 

It comes back with Avg Monthly Searches of 111,360 Competition High, Avg CPC $7.35 and Ad Impression share is 0

 

If i put the location i am at in the front I get back a totally different set of figures.

 

It comes back with Avg Monthly Searches of 120,280 Competition High, Avg CPC $9.11 and Ad Impression share is 0

 

My question is this, which order of the keyword phrase should i use when i am doing Off-Page SEO, say posting in Blogs using anchor text methods??

 

 

Do i want to use a phrase that is Low in competition? Am i going for the highest monthly search volume always? 

 

What is the basic rule of them when choosing which Keyword Phrase that will help me rank the best?

 

What does Avg CPC mean? 

 

Cheers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Edited by seocoffee, 19 September 2013 - 04:09 PM.


#2 qwerty

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 05:55 PM

That's Average Cost Per Click -- what you'd pay if you ran AdWords for the keyword phrase.

 

If you have the tool set up to show you exact match data (as opposed to broad or phrase match), then it makes sense that you'd get different results based on the order of the words in the phrase.

 

Now then... what you want. Assuming the phrase with lots of volume and high competition is truly relevant, then of course you want to rank well for that phrase. You may also want to invest in paid traffic for it. But that's the reason there's high competition. Lots of people want traffic for that phrase, and they're doing what they can to get it.

 

If you're not in a position to get that traffic organically or pay for it, then you have to go for the less competitive phrases, but you should still try to optimize for the popular phrase. Over time, you may get there. And in fact, you should be going for the less competitive phrases too, assuming you have or can create content that will be sufficiently relevant to them. Even if you end up getting traffic for the all-important head term, you'll probably find that your long-tail traffic for all the less competitive phrases combined is more, and may convert better as well.

 

One of the sites I work for is consistently at the top of the results for a pretty competitive keyword phrase, but we use the term in a way that most searchers don't. We're algorithmically very relevant for it, but it's not exactly what people are looking for when they run that search. So we get some traffic out of it, but not nearly as much as you'd expect considering our ranking and the number of impressions we get every month. Instead, we get more traffic from much more specific phrases that are much less competitive and I'm experimenting with variations on that popular phrase to see if that brings us more qualified traffic, because that's what converts.



#3 seocoffee

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 01:16 PM


That's Average Cost Per Click -- what you'd pay if you ran AdWords for the keyword phrase.
~ Cool, thanks i was wondering about that.
 
"If you have the tool set up to show you exact match data (as opposed to broad or phrase match), then it makes sense that you'd get different results based on the order of the words in the phrase."
~ Ok, I think i get this, so i need to figure out if more people are typing in the location first or last.
 
"Now then... what you want. Assuming the phrase with lots of volume and high competition is truly relevant, then of course you want to rank well for that phrase. You may also want to invest in paid traffic for it. But that's the reason there's high competition. Lots of people want traffic for that phrase, and they're doing what they can to get it."
~ I have a major question about the above statement. If I am over on wordtracker.com paying for information about what my competitors are using for search phrases, and my competition is on wordtracker.com paying for information about what I am using, who in the wins and ranks the highest? Is it really the person that has the most backlinks that outranks everyone else.
With my niche, there isn't a whole lot of synonyms that can be generated. So if both of use are using the same information against each other for rank, then isn't it a stalemate? Are backlinks and link juice really the winning elements??
 
"If you're not in a position to get that traffic organically"
~ This site is on googles first page 3rd down (organic results) on high competition relevant niche keywords.
 
or pay for it, then you have to go for the less competitive phrases, but you should still try to optimize for the popular phrase. Over time, you may get there. And in fact, you should be going for the less competitive phrases too, assuming you have or can create content that will be sufficiently relevant to them. Even if you end up getting traffic for the all-important head term, you'll probably find that your long-tail traffic for all the less competitive phrases combined is more, and may convert better as well.
 
One of the sites I work for is consistently at the top of the results for a pretty competitive keyword phrase, but we use the term in a way that most searchers don't. We're algorithmically very relevant for it, but it's not exactly what people are looking for when they run that search. So we get some traffic out of it, but not nearly as much as you'd expect considering our ranking and the number of impressions we get every month.
 
"Instead, we get more traffic from much more specific phrases that are much less competitive"
~ I really think i understand this, these keyword phrases should go i the blogs also, right?!
 
"and I'm experimenting with variations on that popular phrase to see if that brings us more qualified traffic, because that's what converts."
~ I have read where people are talking about "converts" allot, but I am not understanding what they are meaning with that term "converts".?

#4 qwerty

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Posted 22 September 2013 - 07:11 AM

"Instead, we get more traffic from much more specific phrases that are much less competitive"

~ I really think i understand this, these keyword phrases should go i the blogs also, right?!

Yes, blogs are a good place to optimize for long-tail phrases, since you have an easy way to publish new content on a regular basis. The long-tail used to be the phrases you didn't actually need to optimize for. Just by creating relevant content, you'd be using phrases that some small number of people might be searching on. Write enough content, and you're going to get a little bit of traffic for lots of different, relevant, low-competition queries. That's changed a bit over time, and now people will research long-tail phrases and work on optimizing for them.

~ I have read where people are talking about "converts" allot, but I am not understanding what they are meaning with that term "converts".?

You probably mean conversions, unless you're running a religious site :)

A conversion is a visitor to your site taking an action that you've chosen to view as a goal: buying something, requesting information, subscribing to a newsletter, etc. Remember that rankings shouldn't be your goal. You want to rank well enough for certain phrases so that people will come to your site. And having people come to your site also isn't the goal. Just having someone show up and view a page doesn't accomplish anything unless you're running ads that you get paid for every time they load on a page. What you really want all of this to lead up to is a conversion.






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