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Paginated Comments And Seo


Best Answer qwerty , 15 July 2013 - 01:47 PM

I doubt search engines will have a problem with the article being present on every page of comments (rel-next and rel-prev will cover that issue), but I'm not sure it's worth doing for your readers. Most of them will probably land on the first page of the article, read the article, read the comments on that page, then (if they're still interested) click the link to the next page of comments. They're not going to need to see the article again. Are you going to load the page scrolled down to the beginning of the comments?

 

And for those few people who enter at a comment page beyond the first and who want to see the article, I guess it would be fine for it to be there, but would it be that big a deal for them to click one link to get to the article?

 

Putting the article exclusively on the first page would most likely mean you could get away with more comments per page on average, which means less pages.

 

And if you do decide to go with the article just on the first page, I'd still recommend rel-next and rel-prev, because these pages will still be sets that are meant to be consumed together as a group.

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#1 nathanpayne

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 07:02 AM

I have a website which gets over 100 comments per article and they NEED to be paginated for both usability and to keep load down on the server. 

 

I am just a little concerned about the SEO of the article if I were to add paginated comments, as this would more than likely mean duplicate content (the actual article) across numerous URLs within the website. 

 

To be honest I am just looking for suggestions. 

 

 



#2 chrishirst

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 07:48 AM

If only the comments are "paginated" how would it create duplicates?



#3 nathanpayne

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 07:49 AM

Well, would I really want to just have a page of comments about a specific article without the article on show - granted there will be links to article. 



#4 bobmeetin

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 08:04 AM

He seemed to suggest paginating both the original article and comment, so those comments like "I'll be sure to add this to my favorites" and "great article" won't be the only text on the page.

 

I don't see comments impacting server load average, not even 100, maybe page load speed a bit if they're substantial, but certainly not one-liners.


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#5 qwerty

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 08:57 AM

I agree. Unless these are rather long comments, even a hundred of them won't make for a page that loads too slowly. But if you do feel that you need to break them up, use rel-next and rel-prev to let search engines know that pages 2 and on are part of a set that's based on page 1. That way, the link equity for the set will be concentrated on page 1, which will also be the page that shows up in the search results, except in the case of a search on text that's only present in a comment on a later page.



#6 nathanpayne

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 09:04 AM

I agree. Unless these are rather long comments, even a hundred of them won't make for a page that loads too slowly. But if you do feel that you need to break them up, use rel-next and rel-prev to let search engines know that pages 2 and on are part of a set that's based on page 1. That way, the link equity for the set will be concentrated on page 1, which will also be the page that shows up in the search results, except in the case of a search on text that's only present in a comment on a later page.

Some of the comments can be very long, there are times when the comment will be just as long as the article (hundreds of words). It doesn't happen often but possible 1 or 2 comments a week are that long.

 

The page does take a very long time to load with all the comments on the page, the server is OK but when I am returning so many comments and some are HUGE the memory spikes like crazz - hence the pagination :)

 

thanks for the rel-prev and rel-nest suggestion I will implement that - I assume it is OK to have the article on the page even when its sitting on pages past the first?



#7 qwerty

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 01:47 PM   Best Answer

I doubt search engines will have a problem with the article being present on every page of comments (rel-next and rel-prev will cover that issue), but I'm not sure it's worth doing for your readers. Most of them will probably land on the first page of the article, read the article, read the comments on that page, then (if they're still interested) click the link to the next page of comments. They're not going to need to see the article again. Are you going to load the page scrolled down to the beginning of the comments?

 

And for those few people who enter at a comment page beyond the first and who want to see the article, I guess it would be fine for it to be there, but would it be that big a deal for them to click one link to get to the article?

 

Putting the article exclusively on the first page would most likely mean you could get away with more comments per page on average, which means less pages.

 

And if you do decide to go with the article just on the first page, I'd still recommend rel-next and rel-prev, because these pages will still be sets that are meant to be consumed together as a group.



#8 nathanpayne

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 03:50 PM

Looks like my last comment has went missing??

 

Anyway... Comments will be loaded in ajax style but will fall back to rel-next and rel-prev anchors for none JS and search engines, it will auto scroll to the top comment in the list once loaded also (using #comments in the url).

 

Only reason I ask about the article being loaded on each page was down to SEO is it more powerful having the article there for the related comments - but also a usability stand point I prefer to keep things to the least amount of clicks possible for an action. 


Edited by Jill, 15 July 2013 - 04:27 PM.
(Last Comment was there, just pending approval, sorry!)


#9 bobmeetin

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 08:52 AM

People are different, personally I detest pagination. People and especially yours truly have short internet attention spans and any potential wall is a wall.

 

You said comments loaded via AJAX - that commonly means they don't exist on the page unless called and this means that they are not visible to search engines. You might want to verify by doing something simple like viewing page source. This is different than a simple jQuery or Mootools (other JavaScript) function that merely hides the content until requested.



#10 nathanpayne

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 09:02 AM

People are different, personally I detest pagination. People and especially yours truly have short internet attention spans and any potential wall is a wall.

 

You said comments loaded via AJAX - that commonly means they don't exist on the page unless called and this means that they are not visible to search engines. You might want to verify by doing something simple like viewing page source. This is different than a simple jQuery or Mootools (other JavaScript) function that merely hides the content until requested.

 

Do you mean AJAX as in comments get loaded in using AJAX after the first page draw? I always make my first load of the screen with all the data needed and then AJAX when the user asks for page 2 etc. So all the comments are there for the search engine to use. 

 

The next, prev buttons use AJAX but have the normal fall back for search engines. 






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