Jump to content

  • Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Subscribe to HRA Now!

 



Are you a Google Analytics enthusiast?

Share and download Custom Google Analytics Reports, dashboards and advanced segments--for FREE! 

 



 

 www.CustomReportSharing.com 

From the folks who brought you High Rankings!



Photo
- - - - -

Wordpress Theme Question......please


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 lister

lister

    HR 5

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 416 posts

Posted 01 April 2013 - 09:47 PM

I use the out of the box Twenty Twelve theme and it has worked really well for me - i seem to rank well (but could do better) and get about 200 visitors a day which for me is pretty good considering the time I have worked on this particular site...

Anyways - the problem is that the theme doesnt really jive with the rest of my site.

(my blog is in its' own directory)

Long stort short, a reputable developer has made a theme that 100% blends into my site (its the same CSS3 responsive frontend framework) and Id like to use it.

My question is - what should I look for to make sure it "works" with SEO? I will be testing the theme on a test server (on another IP) with dummy articles but is there a "check list" or things to make sure are SEO-crtical? I guess the title PHP tags would be an example....

Thanks


Edited by lister, 01 April 2013 - 09:48 PM.


#2 lister

lister

    HR 5

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 416 posts

Posted 01 April 2013 - 09:57 PM

One blog mentions that a theme he was running gave him a drop in ranking b/c the theme he was using had a faulty rel=canonical link in its header, pointing to the site’s homepage instead of the proper URL for a page or post -

 

That's anothet thing to look for I guess....



#3 Michael Martinez

Michael Martinez

    HR 10

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,133 posts
  • Location:Georgia

Posted 02 April 2013 - 12:53 AM

Long stort short, a reputable developer has made a theme that 100% blends into my site (its the same CSS3 responsive frontend framework) and Id like to use it.

My question is - what should I look for to make sure it "works" with SEO? I will be testing the theme on a test server (on another IP) with dummy articles but is there a "check list" or things to make sure are SEO-crtical? I guess the title PHP tags would be an example....

Thanks

 

It's a rare Wordpress theme that doesn't "work with SEO".

 

You can actually use Twenty Twelve to replicate a lot of different styles.  Just add content as PAGES and use the full-page template that has no sidebar.  The only thing you cannot get rid of is the Wordpress menu but I've had pretty good success transporting non-Wordpress content into Twenty Twelve this way.  (NOTE: There are plugins that will let you hide the Wordpress menu, or so I have been told.)

 

Don't think about "what works with SEO".  Wordpress works just fine with SEO.  Rather, ask yourself how much of Wordpress' native capabilities this custom theme will be changing.  That could screw up the site's optimization in many unexpected ways.


Edited by Michael Martinez, 02 April 2013 - 12:54 AM.


#4 lister

lister

    HR 5

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 416 posts

Posted 02 April 2013 - 09:51 AM

thanks.....I guess once i am happy with the new theme by testing it etc then I can launch it and if I see a dip in traffic ill revert back to the old style and then reverse engineer what went wrong...

 

Im probably being slightly paranoid but its obviously important to get this right -

 

Balancing function and design as always can be a challenge -



#5 jeypandian7

jeypandian7

    HR 1

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
  • Location:Manhattan

Posted 04 April 2013 - 11:54 AM

I'd make sure you check to see that all the basic on page elements function as needed. For example, you'd check to see if you can manually change any of the following items:

  1. Title tags
  2. Meta-description tags
  3. ALT tags
  4. Image file names
  5. Search Engine friendly URLs
  6. 301, 302 redirects
  7. 404 page settings / Custom 404 pages
  8. Canonical tags
  9. Pagination tags
  10. Absolute vs relative URLs


#6 lister

lister

    HR 5

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 416 posts

Posted 06 April 2013 - 03:29 PM

Thanks that is def helpful



#7 chrishirst

chrishirst

    A not so moderate moderator.

  • Moderator
  • 6,960 posts
  • Location:Blackpool UK

Posted 06 April 2013 - 04:46 PM

Probably not that "helpful" given that there is no such thing as an alt "tag"



#8 lister

lister

    HR 5

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 416 posts

Posted 06 April 2013 - 05:20 PM

Probably not that "helpful" given that there is no such thing as an alt "tag"

 

On the subject of the ALT attribute does it really hold value? I mean I know it is there for a really valid purpose, i.e. someone with very slow connection etc etc but does a SE place any value on it? I am guessing the answer is....not much.



#9 chrishirst

chrishirst

    A not so moderate moderator.

  • Moderator
  • 6,960 posts
  • Location:Blackpool UK

Posted 07 April 2013 - 08:08 AM

Only for linked images where it is used instead of anchor text, the pre-millenium days of stuffing alt attributes are consigned to the annals of history.

 

Most of what happened in "SEO 1999" stayed in 1999!



#10 thx1138

thx1138

    HR 4

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 232 posts
  • Location:England

Posted 01 May 2013 - 06:19 AM

Isn't it important to use the alt description for the visually impaired?

 

It seems to me you should be describing the image as best as possible.



#11 qwerty

qwerty

    HR 10

  • Moderator
  • 8,622 posts
  • Location:Somerville, MA

Posted 01 May 2013 - 07:17 AM

That depends on what you consider the best description of the image. The alt attribute should serve to take the place of the image well enough that users will understand what the picture is. An image of a kid playing with a ball is better served with an alt attribute of "child with ball" than something like "this is a picture of lovely red-haired girl of about 9 years, playing with a blue ball in a beautiful, verdant field. She looks like she's enjoying her day very much."

 

In other words, don't try to replace the experience of looking at the image. Just let people know what it is.



#12 torka

torka

    Vintage Babe

  • Moderator
  • 4,626 posts
  • Location:Triangle area, NC, USA, Earth (usually)

Posted 01 May 2013 - 10:20 AM

And if the image is just there as "eye candy" and doesn't have any real meaning or purpose other than to look good, it's perfectly OK to use a blank alt attribute (alt=""). Lets the screen readers ignore the image, pretty much the same way sighted visitors would. ;)

 

--Torka :propeller:






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

SPAM FREE FORUM!
 
If you are just registering to spam,
don't bother. You will be wasting your
time as your spam will never see the
light of day!