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Use Existing Site Or Start Afresh?


Best Answer qwerty , 14 March 2013 - 12:43 PM

Is the previous domain name a ".com" or one of the other more recognized TLDs (.org, .net, etc.)? I ask because the new one you've indicated is a ".co". I would be wary of using a ".co" domain, because at least some of your potential visitors are going to slide right on over into typing ".com" instead and end up at the wrong place.

Slightly off topic, but remember all the hoopla when overstock.com moved to o.co? Didn't last very long...

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#1 PeterW

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 12:46 PM

Hi

 

Great forum.  Spending hours reading, I had now idea SEO was so involved!

 

My question could help or hammer or small business.  

 

Basically we used to run a screenplay contest.  

 

The site was set-up in 2011 and we did a lot of work promoting it, getting it linked on other websites etc.  Got ranked on Google page 3 or so at one stage.  

 

Since the passing of one of our co-founders, we have been forced to switch our business model from a screenplay contest to one that offers screenplay script analysis/feedback only.

 

We have purchased scriptanalysis.co

 

Most of our customers would search on: screenplay analysis or script analysis

 

Our existing site does not contain the keywords in its domain name whatsoever.

 

So the big question is should we use our existing site or scriptanalysis.co?   We're going to put a lot of fresh relevant content up.

 

I presume there's a big advantage in having your customer's search terms in your website's domain name.    

 

But from reading here, I also know google loves sites that have been around for awhile, and also ones with plenty of links to it - which are plus for using our existing site.

 

What to do???

 

Any advice would be hugely appreciated.

 

Kind regards, Pete



#2 qwerty

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 03:28 PM

I presume there's a big advantage in having your customer's search terms in your website's domain name.

Not as big as there used to be. Personally, I think branding and reputation count for a lot more than keywords in a domain name, especially in the long run.



#3 alphamedia

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 09:35 AM

Not as big as there used to be. Personally, I think branding and reputation count for a lot more than keywords in a domain name, especially in the long run.

I think you should go with older site with fresh content and just focused on it to rank well in search engines. The most important reason to continue with the same domain name is, it is already circulated to your market, many of your existing customers will find you with that name and they refer the same domain to others.

So choice is yours now.



#4 torka

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 10:04 AM

I agree, any advantage of a keyworded domain is small and likely to become smaller in the future (if the noises Google has made on the subject are any indication).

 

Is the previous domain name a ".com" or one of the other more recognized TLDs (.org, .net, etc.)? I ask because the new one you've indicated is a ".co". I would be wary of using a ".co" domain, because at least some of your potential visitors are going to slide right on over into typing ".com" instead and end up at the wrong place.

 

Beyond that, I'm not sure "script analysis" is going to turn out to be your top keyword in the first place, and it certainly won't be your only keyword. If it were me, I'd want to avoid focusing too much on this one phrase. If your existing domain is more general (and not specific for a screenplay contest), I'd probably stick with the existing domain.

 

It's not that hard to simply develop new content and modify and/or add to what's already there. Acknowledge the site's beginnings as a contest. That could actually help you in your new venture, by giving you some credibility for your review/analysis/feedback services. I mean, you used to run this contest, and now you're available to help your clients develop their own "winning" screenplays. (Or something like that... this is just off the top of my head. I'm sure with some thought you could come up with something a little snazzier.)

 

My :02:

 

--Torka :propeller:



#5 PeterW

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 11:53 AM

Thanks for the replies from qwerty and torka, very much appreciated.

 

 

Is the previous domain name a ".com" or one of the other more recognized TLDs (.org, .net, etc.)? I ask because the new one you've indicated is a ".co". I would be wary of using a ".co" domain, because at least some of your potential visitors are going to slide right on over into typing ".com" instead and end up at the wrong place.

 

Beyond that, I'm not sure "script analysis" is going to turn out to be your top keyword in the first place, and it certainly won't be your only keyword. If it were me, I'd want to avoid focusing too much on this one phrase. If your existing domain is more general (and not specific for a screenplay contest), I'd probably stick with the existing domain.

 

The previous site is indeed a .com

 

I had thought a site with the keyword in the domain name would have been a big advantage.  I guess all those 1-page content 'parked' sites that hog good domain names have forced google to rethink.  Content is indeed king then.

 

We would obviously must preferred to have bought a .com but as usual, they were taken.

 

When I use google keyword checker, Script Analysis is 100% linked to screenplays.  The short term for a screenplay is a script, so screenwriters tend to search on either script analysis (the most common) or screenplay analysis.  They can also search on screenplay/script feedback and sometimes (less common)  screenplay/script coverage.   I know a script can be a piece of code too but  the two terms combined, script + analysis seem to be exclusively linked to screenplay script analysis.

 

We hugely appreciate your advice.  As a small business reliant on web traffic, such SEO issues can make or break us.



#6 qwerty

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 12:43 PM   Best Answer

Is the previous domain name a ".com" or one of the other more recognized TLDs (.org, .net, etc.)? I ask because the new one you've indicated is a ".co". I would be wary of using a ".co" domain, because at least some of your potential visitors are going to slide right on over into typing ".com" instead and end up at the wrong place.

Slightly off topic, but remember all the hoopla when overstock.com moved to o.co? Didn't last very long...



#7 PeterW

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Posted 15 March 2013 - 08:55 PM

Thanks for qwerty, torka and alphamedia for taking the time to reply. Super helpful and very much appreciated.






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