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Best Answer qwerty , 17 February 2013 - 10:06 AM

SEO is all about customizing your website in a certain way as to make it appear before others in regards to specific search terms

Not really. It's partly about that. Ten years ago there were some debates, and one side claimed that the SEO's job was just to get rankings, by any means necessary. The other side (the one I'm on, as are all of the folks who've been on this forum for a long time) argued that rankings are of no value if they don't lead to click-throughs, and click-throughs are of no value if they don't (eventually) lead to conversions. Our side won. So SEO is about making improvements to a site so that its content is easily read and indexed by search engines and they can see (based on signals like links) that the site is an authority in its field, it targets the right keywords (the ones people looking for the site's goods and services are searching on), attracts people to click through from the search engine results, shows them right away that they've found the right place for what they were looking for, and convinces them to convert. Conversion can be any number of things: buying something, commenting, linking, recommending, subscribing, etc.

 

 

 

Question: Is it just in the code when writing the web pages, the actual text, or both that get targeted by search engines?

 

Both.

 

 

How does one go about starting to link through other websites? Is it like being mentioned in a blog or through Facebook or maybe through a local news channels website?

It's all of those things, and it's gotten harder to do over time, because the search engines have gotten a lot better at at making judgments about links: whether they're editorial vs. paid ads, whether they're relevant, whether they're coming from sites the votes of which count more or less, etc. It used to be that SEOs could simply blast out millions of random spam emails advising site operators that search engines love links (all links) and that they had a lot to gain from trading links with the "author" of the email. If you operate a site, I'm sure you've seen plenty of those emails, and I expect you're smart enough to delete them on sight.

 

 

In the article, "The Hungry Little Spider," the author mentions that cookies make your page less attractive. Am I understanding that right? If so why are cookies bad for SEO?

Search engine spiders can't accept cookies, so if your page won't display unless the user accepts a cookie, the spider isn't going to see your page. But cookies aren't bad for SEO in and of themselves. On most sites that send a cookie to the user, it's not mandatory that the cookie be accepted, so it's not an issue.

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6 replies to this topic

#1 izzo31

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 04:47 PM

Hello. I am new to the site and SEO in general. I am in a marketing class and the current assignment is to post in an SEO forum and then write a paper about the experience of posting and getting replies and then talk about why joining forums like this can help your business (or hinder if that is the writer's view). Basically I would like to know where to start reading to learn more about SEO. Can anyone provide me with some direction as to where I should start reading more about SEO basics? I get the general sense of what it is, but I wanted to go a little more in-depth. Thanks!



#2 qwerty

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 07:19 PM

Welcome to HR. We have a section that's been around for about ten years, and is just what you're looking for. We call it the Tips  For  Newbies.



#3 izzo31

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 07:21 PM

This is exactly what I was looking for! Thank you!



#4 torka

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 09:37 AM

Welcome to the forum. After you've looked over the [url=http://www.highrankings.com/forum/index.php/topic/833-tips-for-new-seos/]Tips for Newbies[/url], feel free to ask any questions you may have at that point. :)

 

--Torka :propeller:



#5 izzo31

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 10:30 PM

So I've learned quite a bit so far. Let me just double check if I am getting this all right.

 

SEO is all about customizing your website in a certain way as to make it appear before others in regards to specific search terms. To do this there are different options you can take such as adding key phrases that your target audience will most likely search with to many of your web pages.

 

Question: Is it just in the code when writing the web pages, the actual text, or both that get targeted by search engines?

 

It is also important to have other websites link to yours. This is where I begin to get confused. How does one go about starting to link through other websites? Is it like being mentioned in a blog or through Facebook or maybe through a local news channels website?

 

One last question before I let this post go for some answers. In the article, "The Hungry Little Spider," the author mentions that cookies make your page less attractive. Am I understanding that right? If so why are cookies bad for SEO?



#6 qwerty

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 10:06 AM   Best Answer

SEO is all about customizing your website in a certain way as to make it appear before others in regards to specific search terms

Not really. It's partly about that. Ten years ago there were some debates, and one side claimed that the SEO's job was just to get rankings, by any means necessary. The other side (the one I'm on, as are all of the folks who've been on this forum for a long time) argued that rankings are of no value if they don't lead to click-throughs, and click-throughs are of no value if they don't (eventually) lead to conversions. Our side won. So SEO is about making improvements to a site so that its content is easily read and indexed by search engines and they can see (based on signals like links) that the site is an authority in its field, it targets the right keywords (the ones people looking for the site's goods and services are searching on), attracts people to click through from the search engine results, shows them right away that they've found the right place for what they were looking for, and convinces them to convert. Conversion can be any number of things: buying something, commenting, linking, recommending, subscribing, etc.

 

 

 

Question: Is it just in the code when writing the web pages, the actual text, or both that get targeted by search engines?

 

Both.

 

 

How does one go about starting to link through other websites? Is it like being mentioned in a blog or through Facebook or maybe through a local news channels website?

It's all of those things, and it's gotten harder to do over time, because the search engines have gotten a lot better at at making judgments about links: whether they're editorial vs. paid ads, whether they're relevant, whether they're coming from sites the votes of which count more or less, etc. It used to be that SEOs could simply blast out millions of random spam emails advising site operators that search engines love links (all links) and that they had a lot to gain from trading links with the "author" of the email. If you operate a site, I'm sure you've seen plenty of those emails, and I expect you're smart enough to delete them on sight.

 

 

In the article, "The Hungry Little Spider," the author mentions that cookies make your page less attractive. Am I understanding that right? If so why are cookies bad for SEO?

Search engine spiders can't accept cookies, so if your page won't display unless the user accepts a cookie, the spider isn't going to see your page. But cookies aren't bad for SEO in and of themselves. On most sites that send a cookie to the user, it's not mandatory that the cookie be accepted, so it's not an issue.


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#7 izzo31

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 04:32 PM

Ok, so rankings are not as important as I was initially led to believe. At least nowadays anyway. However, getting to a high ranking because you have numerous valid click-throughs leading eventually to conversions is the ultimate objective, right? I assume that if you have many click-throughs and conversions then your rank will be higher (as in your visibility upon your industry's key words and phrases being entered into a search engine). Do I have that right?

So basically making your website not only attractive from an aesthetic angle, but also from an indexing angle is important? You want the website to be user-friendly, which will ultimately lead visitors to use multiple click-throughs and hopefully lead to conversions, but you also want the coding (and specifically what your text tells about the website) to be attractive to search engine indexers?


Edited by izzo31, 18 February 2013 - 04:54 PM.





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