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Gov And Edu Backlinks


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27 replies to this topic

#1 fine0023

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Posted 19 October 2012 - 04:02 PM

Just wondering if anyone had thoughts on whether or not .gov and .edu backlinks have some kind of special value. Would a link from a school district that uses .edu be any more valuable than one that uses .org or .us? I assume it depends more on whether the page that actually has the link is buried many sections deep within the site or not.....

#2 Jill

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Posted 19 October 2012 - 05:37 PM

They don't.

#3 piskie

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Posted 21 October 2012 - 07:20 PM

They don't

As you know Jill, I never disagree with you, but I think you're (possibly) wrong on this one.

I once had a clients site that shot up the SERPs shortly after gaining just one .ac.uk backlink. Admittedly this was in a not very competitive sector, but the big rise was very large and the backlink was the only change on the site for many months.

So, I think it might not be such a categoric answer to that question.

#4 torka

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Posted 22 October 2012 - 10:00 AM

A single backlink from any strong page could be enough to make a difference in an uncompetitive space, regardless of the TLD of the linking page.

The question was whether or not there was some "special" authority imputed to .edu or .gov domains by the search engines. Personally, I agree with Jill. I don't know that there's any way to prove it beyond a shadow of a doubt, but I suspect it has a lot more to do with the authority of the linking page itself than it does with the TLD. Your client's site might have experienced just the same movement if the link had some from a similarly authoritative .com or .org domain.

Beyond that, rankings change all the time, often for no discernible reason. To state unequivocally that the change was due to that one link is potentially overstating the case a bit.

My :02:

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#5 qwerty

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Posted 22 October 2012 - 11:21 AM



That video is almost three years old, and of course you're not required to take Mr. Cutts at his word, but around the 2 minute mark he states that "it's not like a link from an edu automatically carries more weight, or a link from a gov automatically carries more weight."

Cool... I didn't know you could embed a video in a forum post.

Edited by qwerty, 22 October 2012 - 11:22 AM.

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#6 chrishirst

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 05:20 AM

And again (Time mark set)

http://www.youtube.c...63OGjfo#t=4m08s

#7 CathyS

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 09:22 AM

In the video posted by Moderator, Cutts does say that because .edu and .gov tend to be sites that other authority sites link to, .edu and .gov sites may pass more value on to sites they link to ... So it sounds to me that although just having a .edu and .gov URL won't make a difference, it still would be beneficial, in general, to have links from those types of sites. Am I missing something?

#8 chrishirst

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 10:08 AM

Am I missing something?

Yes. It because of WHAT they are not WHERE they are.

#9 qwerty

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 11:59 AM

You want to get links from solid, authoritative sites, and yes, it's very common for educational and governmental sites to be solid and authoritative. The point is that they're not solid and authoritative because they're educational and governmental, and they certainly don't have those traits because of what their top level domain happens to be.

And the thing that always seems to get left out of this discussion is that for the vast majority of commercial sites, there's just no reason for a university or a government body to link to them. My little freelance SEO business happens to be located two blocks from the campus of Harvard University. Is that a reason for harvard.edu to link to me? Of course not. Maybe if I was offering valuable work experience through internships for Harvard students, but I don't think what I do is at all relevant to the course of study any of their students are working on.

You should also keep in mind that that question of relevance goes both ways. Yeah, a link from a high PR page on Harvard's site is going to send me a decent amount of link juice, but does their site have any pages that are thematically related to what I do, and as such would serve to tell Google not just that I'm worthy of citation, but that I'm relevant to some concept or keyword phrase? I haven't looked, but I kind of doubt it. When Harvard publishes a page on SEO, maybe then I'll consider stopping by their webmaster's office.

#10 SelfMade

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 08:02 AM

Interesting thread.

 

Here is what I think about Cutts.

 

I think, whenever people get even remotely close to anything that "might" be working, he pop's out and says "oh, that's useless..it won't do anything..pointless".

 

His sole job is spin.

 

To throw people off the scent. Whenever he comes out and says that, I think whatever he says is "useless" is EXACTLY what you should be doing.

 

In my opinion anyway.



#11 Jill

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 09:31 AM

To throw people off the scent. Whenever he comes out and says that, I think whatever he says is "useless" is EXACTLY what you should be doing.


Perhaps in the past but today google actually puts their money where their mouth is.

#12 chrishirst

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 10:48 AM

To throw people off the scent. Whenever he comes out and says that, I think whatever he says is "useless" is EXACTLY what you should be doing.

Excellent plan!

 

So that's one more collection of URLs your "competitors" have no need to be concerned about.



#13 qwerty

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 11:02 AM

If his "sole job is spin" does that mean that the other side of the coin is also true? That is, when Cutts specifically suggests a particular practice, should you take it to mean that that's something you definitely shouldn't do?

 

Look, this really comes down to common sense. When you watch one of his videos, he doesn't just reel off a list of things you should and shouldn't do. He explains why you should and shouldn't do those things. Sometimes he'll explain that from a user's perspective, and sometimes he'll just give you Google's perspective (which, more often than not, is based on what Google believes is best for users). So listen to those explanations and decide for yourself whether they make sense, and do that from those perspectives, not from the perspective of someone whose job is to increase traffic and conversions on some particular site. Does what he says make sense in that context? Does it seem he's making recommendations that would help Google determine which pages are more valuable to users?

 

I think it's pretty rare for his recommendations to be so easily labeled as FUD. Yes, it happens, but I think most of the time he makes a lot of sense, even if what he says isn't necessarily good news for web marketers. If you want to think that's spin, I guess that's your prerogative, but I have to wonder why things that make sense for users wouldn't be the intent behind a search engine's actions. Sometimes, making the user experience worse for the sake of profits might be the answer, but again, in my experience I've found that to be pretty rare.


Edited by qwerty, 05 January 2013 - 11:09 AM.


#14 SelfMade

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 11:19 AM

Excellent plan!

 

So that's one more collection of URLs your "competitors" have no need to be concerned about.

 

Above quote, No, I don't understand what you mean?

 

If his "sole job is spin" does that mean that the other side of the coin is also true? That is, when Cutts specifically suggests a particular practice, should you take it to mean that that's something you definitely shouldn't do?

 

In my opinion, which means nothing as I do paid traffic mainly, but yes I do.

 

For example, just recently he said backlinks were worthless, that turned out to be complete rubbish.

 

I think people give the G algo more credit for intelligence than it actually has, that's down to matt's spin doctoring.

 

At the end of the day, it's a damned computer.


Edited by SelfMade, 05 January 2013 - 11:21 AM.


#15 qwerty

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 11:22 AM

For example, just recently he said backlinks were worthless

 

Citation, please. I have a sneaking suspicion you're twisting what he said just a bit.






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