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Redirect Multiple Domains


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10 replies to this topic

#1 vision2000

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 10:45 AM

If I have 4 domains from different sources and I want to link them up to one site will ranks be passed accross with the 301?

#2 StraightUpSEO

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 12:47 PM

If I have 4 domains from different sources and I want to link them up to one site will ranks be passed accross with the 301?


301 will pass most (99.9% value), you will need to setup the redirects properly and leave them up for at least one month.

The best way to go about this would to do something like this:

Green-shoes.com > (301) > Ultimate-shoes.com/green-shoes
Checkered-shoes.com > (301) > Ultimate-shoes.com/checkered-shoes
Used-shoes.com > (301) > Ultimate-shoes.com/used-shoes

After one month, if you still are looking to pass rank to your homepage;

Ultimate-shoes.com/green-shoes > (301) > Ultimate-shoes.com

and so on.

Good luck!

#3 Jill

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 12:55 PM

301 will pass most (99.9% value), you will need to setup the redirects properly and leave them up for at least one month.


If you remove them, they will no longer pass *any* PageRank.

#4 StraightUpSEO

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 01:11 PM

If you remove them, they will no longer pass *any* PageRank.


Passing a link through a permanent 301 is *supposed* to pass the PageRank permanently. Google updates their PageRank each month. Each page has a calculated number by the end of that calculation.

One months time would achieve what HR1's looking for. Once the PageRank is passed, you can get rid of the page. Webmaster tools has this inside it's panel I believe. (Go longer than 1 month, Google is sketchy with these)

#5 Jill

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 01:18 PM

One months time would achieve what HR1's looking for. Once the PageRank is passed, you can get rid of the page. Webmaster tools has this inside it's panel I believe. (Go longer than 1 month, Google is sketchy with these)


And you know this how? I am pretty sure that's not true, but if you have some sort of proof of this, I'm interested in hearing it.

My advice is to leave the redirects in place permanently when possible.

#6 StraightUpSEO

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 01:59 PM

And you know this how? I am pretty sure that's not true, but if you have some sort of proof of this, I'm interested in hearing it.

My advice is to leave the redirects in place permanently when possible.


I highly doubt Google would let us know where the gold is made. ;) Perhaps it's a trickle system like you suggest, but I believe it works as an economy (PR gets generated within). I tried looking up proof, but I cannot find it. I may have read it, or in my own experiences, I've concluded this. Either way, I agree with Jill. Permanent redirects are better, but they system seems to have been made for MOVING domains, not URL redirects! URL redirects are CANONICAL. 301 is MOVING. Google knows this, they are a search engine!

#7 Jill

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 10:48 PM

Permanent redirects are better, but they system seems to have been made for MOVING domains, not URL redirects! URL redirects are CANONICAL. 301 is MOVING. Google knows this, they are a search engine!


Sorry, I have no idea what that means.

#8 StraightUpSEO

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 02:26 AM

With a Canonical link, it should be possible to keep both websites going. You can pass on PR with Canonical, while keep your content up on the old site.

IF you cannot keep your old content up for whatever reason, a 301 redirect is suggested. 301 Redirects were made so when you needed to move domains or URLs, Google could easily redirect all PR and SERPs to the new listing.

#9 chrishirst

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 06:55 AM

Returning a 301 response doesn't change the links that already point to a particular URI (and passing REAL PR so if you remove the redirect thos links will be back happily passing value to the OLD URI

#10 Jill

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 07:22 AM

With a Canonical link, it should be possible to keep both websites going. You can pass on PR with Canonical, while keep your content up on the old site.

IF you cannot keep your old content up for whatever reason, a 301 redirect is suggested. 301 Redirects were made so when you needed to move domains or URLs, Google could easily redirect all PR and SERPs to the new listing.


That entire thing made no sense whatsoever as related to what's been being said in this thread.

#11 qwerty

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 12:25 PM

301 Redirects were made so when you needed to move domains or URLs, Google could easily redirect all PR and SERPs to the new listing.

That kind of makes it sound like the 301 redirect is a tool Google created for SEO, and that's certainly not the case. Server response codes predate Google by years. Google interprets 301 redirects, based on what they were intended to do: dealing with the permanent relocation of content from one URL to another. From Google's perspective, the discovery that content has been permanently moved means that they should attribute the authority the old URL had earned to the new one (most of it, anyway).

But the effect of a "permanent" redirect is only as permanent as the redirect. If you take it down because you don't want to pay to host a site you're no longer using for anything but the redirect, or because you've sold the domain, then you're no longer sending the message that the content Google used to attribute to the old site (which other sites are still linking to) is now located at the new site. You're breaking that connection, and there could be a lot of different interpretations as to what that means from the perspective of a search engine.




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