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To Cms Or Not To Cms?


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21 replies to this topic

#1 Hans G.

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Posted 13 December 2011 - 11:27 PM

Hi, all. I'm working on a Website that requires the client to update a specific section (300w x 500h) of the home page. They're basically posting new data every week. I don't want to give them access to the home page file (index.html), as there's a risk that they can mess things up. Is there some sort of simple javascript (or other) code, or CMS that I can add that is isolated, and only lets the client to update that specific isolated rectangle box on the home page?

#2 Michael Martinez

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 02:41 PM

There are all sorts of Javascript widgets you should be able to cannibalize. Or if it doesn't matter whether the content is indexed by the search engines, you could just iframe their updated segment.

You might also consider doing a server-side include in Perl or PHP that just reads a text file and injects it into the page HTML (search engines would be able to see and index the content that way).

#3 Hans G.

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 03:03 PM

QUOTE
"You might also consider doing a server-side include in Perl or PHP that just reads a text file and injects it into the page HTML (search engines would be able to see and index the content that way). "


Thanks, Mike. I'm no programmer, so how difficult would that be to build? I guess I could outsource it; unless you know an easy way for me to do it. Would the home page need to be converted from html to php or asp? I rather keep it html.

#4 smc_online

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 04:12 PM

Hans,

The iframe would be the simplest implementation. If you decide to take the php approach, you should not need to convert the page from html to php.

#5 Michael Martinez

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 05:56 PM

QUOTE(Hans G. @ Dec 14 2011, 12:03 PM) View Post
"You might also consider doing a server-side include in Perl or PHP that just reads a text file and injects it into the page HTML (search engines would be able to see and index the content that way). "

Thanks, Mike. I'm no programmer, so how difficult would that be to build? I guess I could outsource it; unless you know an easy way for me to do it. Would the home page need to be converted from html to php or asp? I rather keep it html.


I agree with smc_online that the inline frame would be the easiest approach. But you could probably find some simple examples of how to code a server-side include script for your site. I think, actually, you can just include a text file. It's been a while since I have had to code one so I don't remember everything exactly off the top of my head.

#6 Jill

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 06:09 PM

While an iframe would be easiest, if you're optimizing the page, that content won't count as content on that page.

#7 chrishirst

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 06:28 PM

If you have PHP available take a look at this Elated article on implementing a simple CMS.

It should be a simple task to make it write to a single page that can be included in your page.


#8 Hans G.

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Posted 15 December 2011 - 10:55 AM

All of you....are outstanding. It boggles my mind that I can access the Creme de La Creme of our industry 24/7, and get substantive, thorough and highly effective feedback. Amazing.

Happy Holidays to you all!

H

#9 Hans G.

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Posted 15 December 2011 - 01:18 PM

Thanks, again to all. I decided to go the iFrame route. Works brilliantly. Now there's just a small strip on the home page that the client can edit directly. Minor problem now is that links only open within the iFrame. How can they open into the browser instead (as if it was a normal link on the home page)? Or are we now only limited to opening links in a new window?

#10 cfreek

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Posted 15 December 2011 - 01:31 PM

Use the target attribute on the link, or set the base target on the document:
http://stackoverflow...e-parent-window

#11 Hans G.

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Posted 15 December 2011 - 04:12 PM

Bravo! Worked great, thanks!

#12 piskie

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Posted 18 December 2011 - 05:18 AM

Avoid the Iframe if at all possible.
You can acieve exactly the same with a php include inserting a Div. That would involve similar complexity but would provide far better SEO results. Plus, the Iframe file itself can get indexed and visitors will arrive to an orphaned Iframe page out of context. To solve that, you would probably need a Javascript reloader.

So much disadvantage using an Iframe as opposed to a Div php include that it is just not an option in my mind.

#13 Michael Martinez

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Posted 18 December 2011 - 02:21 PM

QUOTE(piskie @ Dec 18 2011, 02:18 AM) View Post
...Plus, the Iframe file itself can get indexed and visitors will arrive to an orphaned Iframe page out of context....
That would only happen (under current crawler behaviors) if someone actually linked to the iFramed page with a crawlable link.

Crawlers do not presently follow iFrame links (but they have not promised to NEVER crawl iFramed pages).

It's easy enough to embed a "robots" meta directive on an iFramed page, however, that says "nofollow,noindex,noarchive".



#14 chrishirst

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Posted 19 December 2011 - 10:10 AM

Actually Michael, they DO "follow" the src attribute of frames and iframes and have done for avery long time.

http://www.google.co.....must use the"

And the only place a direct link exists to that page is ON the page in the iframe. So get a direct link they have to index the src attribute first.

#15 Michael Martinez

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Posted 19 December 2011 - 02:40 PM

QUOTE(chrishirst @ Dec 19 2011, 07:10 AM) View Post
Actually Michael, they DO "follow" the src attribute of frames and iframes and have done for avery long time.

http://www.google.co.....must use the"

And the only place a direct link exists to that page is ON the page in the iframe. So get a direct link they have to index the src attribute first.


I have many iFramed pages that are not indexed and I haven't even bothered to embed "NoIndex" on them.




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