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Can I Trust Wordtracker?


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11 replies to this topic

#1 sparish75

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 07:12 AM

I understand that different word tracking tools use different data bases, but when wordtracker says there are 30 searches per day and Google Keyword Tools says there are - per month (0 per month); can I trust wordtracker? If no one is searching for my keyword obviously I don't want to use it. I'm apprehensive to target a keyword from wordtraker, when Google tools tells me no one is searching for it?

Can anyone clear this up for me please?

#2 Jill

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 08:33 AM

I would probably trust the google numbers over the wordtracker ones.

#3 OldWelshGuy

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 11:53 AM

30 is such a low sample, it is probably worth running a quick adwords campaign to test. It will pay for itself in no time at all, and ensure you are not targeting a dud. Build a landing page (if you don't have one), set up the campaign, ensure it is exact match, and that content network and partners etc are turned off (so you only appear on google searches), bid yourself to at least #4 then each impression is a search.

you should get 100% accurate data that way.

#4 Michael Martinez

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 12:26 PM

Google's data is only valid for Google.

Wordtracker's data is only valid for the small set of search engines from which it collects data (and I don't believe they use Google).

You can use Wordtracker to get an idea of things people search for. But basing your SEO on traffic estimates from any keyword tool is a bit risky. You want to balance that approach with creating brand value content that people will want to search for even though they have never searched for it before.

#5 sparish75

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 04:00 PM

Thanks for your help; you have given me some ideas to run with.

#6 squidjam

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 01:18 PM

I hadn't even thought about WordTracker for years, but recently while trying to brush up on my keyword research skills, I stumbled upon people (content marketers, affiliate marketers, etc.) who were using it instead of the Google Keyword Tool.

 

These people claim that WordTracker gives cleaner results because it filters out all the automated searches that marketers and others are doing with keyword software, etc. They claim that a good deal of the searches that happen in Google are other people checking their results, which I can believe and I think Jill has mentioned before.

 

The WordTracker numbers are much different than the ones in Google Keyword Tool. WordTracker explains is like this: 


 

For the Wordtracker data, the Search count is the number of times each keyword appears in our database of searches over the past 365 days. This constitutes just under 1% of all US search, and the data is gathered from metacrawler.com and dogpile.com.

The database is updated every day, and new data is between 15 and 30 hours old when it hits the live servers. If you’re searching using the Google data, the information presented is from SEMrush's API. It’s Exact Match data , and the search volumes are from the last available month (in real terms this normally means the last calendar month).

 

I just read that a couple of times and I'm not exactly sure what it's saying. I think they mean they compile a database of searches over the last 365 days, but if you're using their keyword tool, the search numbers they present are from the last calendar month.

 

I've been quoted a formula for converting WordTracker numbers  so that they are more comparable to those in the Google Keyword Tool, which is to multiple WordTracker numbers by 200, then divide by 12. Not sure how this was arrived at...

 

On the WordTracker site they say that their keyword tool "Wordtracker’s data comes from two smaller search engines, Dogpile.com and Metacrawler.com, so these are real searches made by real people."  My first response was "Dogpile still exists?!" LOL  My second response was, how is it that they know that their searches are made by "real people" and don't contain any automated software checks? (Haven't done enough searching on their site to answer the second one.)  I did notice that both Dogpile and Metacrawler are owned by the same company, Infospace.

 

On both the Dogpile and Metacrawler sites, it says their search results are from Google, Yahoo, and Yandex. So if that's true, then I don't see how those results wouldn't contain some automated search data, since they would contain searches from Google.

 

Jill, you're my go-to expert on things of this nature so I trust your opinion to trust Google numbers over WordTracker. I certainly cannot see why anyone would pay for the full version of WordTracker. They claim they have some metrics that help you determin competiton and such, but I'm not convinced after reading some posts here on the forum and elsewhere.

 

I think it's easy to get wrapped up in numbers and lose site of things as well. I don't take the search volume numbers as exact or precise, since they aren't. I take them as estimates and a general yardstick by which to measure things. I look at relationships between phrases. Lots of things. And there are not guarantees...all that jazz  :)

 

Just my comments and hopefully I'm on track :)



#7 Jill

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 02:26 PM

My opinion is the same as it's been for years. No real people use dogpile and metacrawler, which has to make their info useless. 



#8 Michael Martinez

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 09:05 AM

Even if one believes that DogPile and MetaCrawler are being used and their query data is reliable, it's only reliable for analyzing the search traffic patterns on DogPile and MetaCrawler.

 

Google's keyword data is only good for analyzing Google's traffic.

 

Bing's keyword data is only good for analyzing Bing's traffic.

 

To take an incompatible data set from another search service and "convert it" to be compatible with Google's data makes no sense.  You're just further invalidating invalid data.



#9 squidjam

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 09:13 AM

Yep, what you say is true Michael.

 

Converting the data from one search service to another made little sense to me as well.

 

Dogpile and Meta Crawler say they're using data from Google, Yahoo, and Yandex (whatever the heck Yandex is...) but how would they get data from Google and Yahoo? Since I'm no expert it makes no sense to me.



#10 Jill

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 10:04 AM

Dogpile and Meta Crawler say they're using data from Google, Yahoo, and Yandex (whatever the heck Yandex is...) but how would they get data from Google and Yahoo? Since I'm no expert it makes no sense to me.

 

No. They SHOW data from those engines when you do a search on dogpile or metacrawler. So they do not get info on what Google searchers are searching on.



#11 squidjam

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 12:04 PM

Thanks Jill. Makes sense.

 

So I don't see why anyone would really use WordTracker, let alone pay for it.



#12 Michael Martinez

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 06:25 PM

Anyone wanting to learn how to do market research should invest time (and a little money) in various tools to get some hands-on experience.  If you learn everything from reading blogs and forums -- even if what you read is good, sound advice -- you're relying on "book learning", which in my book doesn't pay off nearly as well as making some mistakes and figuring out where things have gone wrong.

 

Some people may get real creative value from tools like Wordtracker but it's at least providing some alternative ideas from the more popular tools.  And, believe me, just about anything that 90% of the industry uses turns into crap really quickly unless you know how to leverage data beyond what you read in blogs and forums.


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