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Does Having A Video Transcript In Text Help?


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13 replies to this topic

#1 ttw

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Posted 24 August 2011 - 11:02 AM

I'm trying to encourage my client to launch a white board series video program similar to what is shown here at SEOMoz . In addition to creating the video I'm recommending that we also provide a text transcript. I believe that both the video and the text will be useful to their audience and the text could give us an extra SEO boost.

I've had a few video transcriptions done by Mechanical Turk and they were excellent and cheap.

What are your thoughts and is there an automated way to do these transcripts?

Thanks

Rosemary

#2 Jill

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Posted 24 August 2011 - 11:45 AM

Absolutely a good idea. There's no other real way of having the content of the video indexed.

#3 Ignoramus

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Posted 24 August 2011 - 04:55 PM

QUOTE(Jill @ Aug 24 2011, 05:45 PM) View Post
Absolutely a good idea. There's no other real way of having the content of the video indexed.


Does uploading your video to YouTube count ?

They allow 1000 characters for a description of the video.

#4 Mikl

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Posted 25 August 2011 - 07:01 AM

Rosemary,

I can't offer any suggestions for how you create the transcript, but I do believe that a transcript is essential.

There will always be visitors who don't have the time, inclination or bandwidth to sit through a video. I'm probably one of them. In many cases, a piece of text is much more convenient. You can read it at your own pace, print it, take it with you, copy it to a text file or a note-pad utility, and read it without disturbing your co-workers.

There are some situations where a video works better than text - if the video actually shows something. For example, how to fix a puncture or give artificial respiration. In those cases, a transcript will be much less useful. But where the video simply consists of a person talking to the camera, explaining something like how to do SEO - that's when you need a transcript. (But in those cases, I would argue that the video is a waste of time, and you should just write the text and leave it at that).

#5 Jill

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Posted 25 August 2011 - 11:23 AM

QUOTE(Ignoramus @ Aug 24 2011, 05:55 PM) View Post
Does uploading your video to YouTube count ?



Count for what?

1000 characters is not a transcript.

#6 Tom Philo

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Posted 25 August 2011 - 05:17 PM

If someone thinks that doing a transcript is not worth it - then maybe the video was not worth it?
Even when visuals are really better in explaining, you can STILL write a description to go along with the action. And people searching will find the transcripts and then have both.
I've been videotaping and transcribing our meeting presentations for 9 years - and the data in the text is a LOT easier to find than the words in a videotape!


#7 Catz

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Posted 26 August 2011 - 11:30 PM

I've always focused on user friendly, accessible web design and wondered where the issue was with those who are hearing impaired.

I make sure to be careful with the colors used online for those who are color blind, but never thought those with a hearing impairment were missing out on too much, until online videos became more popular.

Missing the music or even added background sounds in sites doesn't matter so much but in a video tutorial or something showing screenshots, they totally miss out on what is going on.

I found myself transcribing some videos with a timeline for a deaf student in one of my coding courses, but I did it personally, the old fashion way, listen and type, adding the timeline to make it easier to know when things were being said.

Looking into it, there are programs that try to translate but it looks like you do have to go back over them and do your own edits and corrections where they mess it up. That technology is improving, but it's not great yet.

There is no doubt that having the text on the page that is in the video would work to your advantage from an SEO perspective, that's the all important content, translated from a video file which the spiders can't read spider.gif into text which they can.

It takes a little while but it's well worth it.

#8 torka

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Posted 28 August 2011 - 11:54 AM

Slightly on a tangent, but (as long as you're working in English or Japanese) there's no need to spend the effort to timeline your transcription file by hand...

If you have a basic transcript (without the timeline) in basic text format you can upload it to YouTube along with the video and it will make it into a caption file (with the timeline) automatically for you. Since you're uploading the text, you don't have to go back later and correct where an automated program might have "mis heard" what was said. It apparently compares the written text you upload versus the audio and uses that to insert time markers where necessary. So far it seems to have been pretty accurate.

It's saved me a lot of time when working to make my employer's product support videos accessible as well as search-friendly.

Once you've uploaded the basic video, select to edit it and go to the "Captions and Subtitles" tab. From there you can upload either a caption file (with timeline) or a transcript file (without timeline). If you upload the transcription, YouTube will convert it to a caption file and add the timeline. It says it's a beta feature and only available in English and Japanese, but it's worked very well with all the videos I've tried. (They've all been in English, FWIW.)

It's been a big time saver for me.

Plus, once the caption file has been created, you can download it and use it for anything else where you need/want a caption file.

HTH! cheers.gif

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#9 Catz

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Posted 28 August 2011 - 02:42 PM

Sounds good, if you already have a transcription completed, but the timeline was the easy part (at least in my case).

Will it work even if you choose not to host the video on YouTube?

Or is it possible to do even if it is not your video you are transcribing, but one you are using for reference? That would be great, if you could get the videos you like to use as reference to get some captioning online, but that has to be the video creator/poster's decision I would expect, and they would have to take the time to do it if they chose to.

I have seen the beta option, but not a lot of videos using it yet. It's interesting to hear from someone who has used it.

QUOTE
Plus, once the caption file has been created, you can download it and use it for anything else where you need/want a caption file.

This was a little confusing, could you elaborate on what you mean here?

How would you use the caption file for something else?

#10 ttw

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Posted 29 August 2011 - 10:10 AM

If you don't have the transcript, you can very inexpensively hire contractors through Mechanical Turk to do the transcription (less than $10 per video). For the few videos that I've had them transcribe, the text has been perfect except for capitalization on branded terms.

#11 Jill

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Posted 29 August 2011 - 11:10 AM

QUOTE(torka @ Aug 28 2011, 12:54 PM) View Post
Once you've uploaded the basic video, select to edit it and go to the "Captions and Subtitles" tab. From there you can upload either a caption file (with timeline) or a transcript file (without timeline). If you upload the transcription, YouTube will convert it to a caption file and add the timeline. It says it's a beta feature and only available in English and Japanese, but it's worked very well with all the videos I've tried. (They've all been in English, FWIW.)


That's awesome, and good information to know. Thanks, Torka!

#12 torka

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Posted 29 August 2011 - 08:38 PM

QUOTE(Catz @ Aug 28 2011, 03:42 PM) View Post
This was a little confusing, could you elaborate on what you mean here?

How would you use the caption file for something else?

I'm not really talking about using it for some other purpose, but rather in other places. For instance, I assume some other video upload sites might also accept timelined caption files. So, you can upload the video to YouTube, upload a plain text transcription, let YouTube timeline the file, then download the timelined caption file YouTube has automatically created for you.

If you then choose to also upload the video to other video hosting sites that accept caption files, you already have one, conveniently created for you by YouTube. thumbup1.gif

And perhaps video streaming software you might want to use/install on your own website could use a timelined caption file to serve up "CC" content for your videos?

In our case, we didn't even have to create the transcription file from scratch, since we'd scripted out the original video before we recorded it. All we had to do was clean up the script a little bit and we had a word-for-word transcript all ready to go. Sweeeet. smile.gif

--Torka mf_prop.gif

#13 Akuta

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Posted 08 September 2011 - 06:55 PM

I have a question that's loosely related... I'm working on a video subscription site and the individual pages for each video are accessible by everyone, but free members can only see the first 5 minutes. Would making the transcript for each of these videos available to subscribers AND Google bot be a good way to go about it? Making it freely available to everyone wouldn't help conversions too much unless it's hidden, so I don't see too many options available.

#14 Jill

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Posted 09 September 2011 - 08:52 AM

QUOTE
Would making the transcript for each of these videos available to subscribers AND Google bot be a good way to go about it?


If you make the entire thing available to Google, then you have to allow anyone coming from Google to see the entire transcript. It's called Google's first click free program.

Do NOT show it all to Google and then make it inaccessible to anyone who comes to the page from Google. That could very well get you in trouble with the big G.




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