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Links Showing Up In Reports


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3 replies to this topic

#1 highpowersites

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Posted 19 August 2011 - 12:56 PM

How long does it take for back links to show up in back link reports? I have been building back links to a particular website and know we have built hundreds of them over the last 4 months but very few are showing up in the back link reports.

Does this mean that Google has never found them or just that these reports are wrong?

I have checked using:

[a back link checker]

Is there a better tool as Yahoo site explorer is shutting down.

Thank you,
Scott

#2 Michael Martinez

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Posted 19 August 2011 - 02:37 PM

You're wasting your efforts for a variety of reasons.

The search engines don't trust all links. Therefore just because you create links doesn't mean they'll all pass value, or that they'll pass value for long.

Secondly, no search engine or SEO tool has any insight or information into what another index knows. That is, you CANNOT use Yahoo!, or Bing, or SEOmoz, or Majestic SEO to see how many links Google has indexed. Nor can you use Google to check on those services. There is no interchangeability in the data; each service collects its own data and that data is unique to that service.

Third, if you're counting on links to create most of the value that will achieve your search rankings, you're eliminating the vast majority of your search referral opportunities. Good links don't help with your keywords -- they help by showing the search engines that your sites are trusted, valued resources.

If you have created several hundred links over the past few months, it's highly unlikely (though not impossible) that they could be providing any real value. The kinds of value-producing links you might be able to produce in volume are developed through partnerships with trusted (and trustworthy) Websites. Not reciprocal linking, but high profile content syndication agreements, or special widget placement contracts, and other relationships that have sound business reasons for existing.

Submitting links to directories, distributing articles to archives, seeding forum profiles, commenting on blogs, etc. are terrible link building methods with low return on investment. If those are the kinds of links you have been investing in, it should be no wonder why you're not finding them in the tools you're using.

#3 highpowersites

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Posted 19 August 2011 - 03:07 PM

QUOTE(Michael Martinez @ Aug 19 2011, 03:37 PM) View Post
You're wasting your efforts for a variety of reasons.

The search engines don't trust all links. Therefore just because you create links doesn't mean they'll all pass value, or that they'll pass value for long.

Secondly, no search engine or SEO tool has any insight or information into what another index knows. That is, you CANNOT use Yahoo!, or Bing, or SEOmoz, or Majestic SEO to see how many links Google has indexed. Nor can you use Google to check on those services. There is no interchangeability in the data; each service collects its own data and that data is unique to that service.

Third, if you're counting on links to create most of the value that will achieve your search rankings, you're eliminating the vast majority of your search referral opportunities. Good links don't help with your keywords -- they help by showing the search engines that your sites are trusted, valued resources.

If you have created several hundred links over the past few months, it's highly unlikely (though not impossible) that they could be providing any real value. The kinds of value-producing links you might be able to produce in volume are developed through partnerships with trusted (and trustworthy) Websites. Not reciprocal linking, but high profile content syndication agreements, or special widget placement contracts, and other relationships that have sound business reasons for existing.

Submitting links to directories, distributing articles to archives, seeding forum profiles, commenting on blogs, etc. are terrible link building methods with low return on investment. If those are the kinds of links you have been investing in, it should be no wonder why you're not finding them in the tools you're using.


Michael:

Thank you for such a detailed reply.

I am building a wide variety of back links including high profile content syndication, gust blogging etc.... I am working to ensure the back link profile is very diversified.

I just do not see many of those in the reports. However, maybe what you say is correct that Google may have found them but these reports can't see that. Is this what you are saying?

Thank you,
Scott

#4 Michael Martinez

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Posted 19 August 2011 - 06:47 PM

QUOTE(highpowersites @ Aug 19 2011, 01:07 PM) View Post
I just do not see many of those in the reports. However, maybe what you say is correct that Google may have found them but these reports can't see that. Is this what you are saying?


Close enough.

If you want to know which links Google has found, search for those linking pages on Google. You can use info:, cache:, or site: to find the pages.

If you want to know if the links are passing value, the only reliable test is to use unique anchor text. If you search on the unique anchor text and the target page appears in the search results, then that indicates the link is trusted enough (or supported by enough internal PageRank) to allow it to pass anchor text to its destination.


"unique anchor text" means just that. The expression is embedded on 1 and only 1 page: the linking page. If it is allowed to pass, it is associated with the destination page.

However, some people use "noisy unique anchor text", where the expression is not necessarily unique but nonetheless does not appear on the destination page. If the destination page appears in the search results for the anchor expression, it is assumed the link passed value.

For these kinds of tests to be valid (or reliable), none of their terms should be included in the destination page's text.

However, once you place two or more links that share the same anchor expression, you can no longer determine any of the links passes value.

This is why it's better to NOT fuss over links and targeted anchor text but rather to focus on creating value that attracts links naturally. Optimizing your pages for the most important expressions then becomes easier.




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