Jump to content

  • Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Subscribe to HRA Now!

 



Are you a Google Analytics enthusiast?

Share and download Custom Google Analytics Reports, dashboards and advanced segments--for FREE! 

 



 

 www.CustomReportSharing.com 

From the folks who brought you High Rankings!



Photo
- - - - -

Sharing The Backend On 2 Sites


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 rolf

rolf

    HR 6

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 675 posts
  • Location:Suffolk UK

Posted 16 June 2011 - 05:12 AM

We already run a very niche site with a highly appropriately descriptive niche trading name (lets call it Traditional Lederhosen Inc.) and we have just begun working on a similar but different niche site with a similarly appropriate trading name (lets call that Modern Lederhosen Inc).

Because of the niche nature of each company they need to have separate websites that are targeted slightly differently, however, there is also a lot of crossover (in how the sites are constructed, some of the products sold and a number of the databases that generate product pages) so using some of the same backend would save me a load of time in the construction and the maintenance.

My initial thought is that if I park the new domain over the old domain, and house the entire new site in a directory or subdomain, then I may be able to use .htaccess to direct anyone coming in on the new domain straight to the right place, whilst leaving all of the existing traffic alone - is that Possible? Sensible? Overcomplicated?

Can you suggest a better way to approach this?

Thanks in advance.

P.S. I may be inappropriately interchanging the terms 'parking' and 'mapping' here, and may be entirely omitting the correct term for what I actually mean :-)

#2 1dmf

1dmf

    Keep Asking, Keep Questioning, Keep Learning

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,161 posts
  • Location:Worthing - England

Posted 16 June 2011 - 05:34 AM

parking is normally when the domain is sitting on hosting that doesn't serve any content : http://en.wikipedia..../Domain_parking

So i don't think you mean that!

In IIS you set up the server to serve requests for the new domain and point it to a sub folder on the physical web server hard drive. then All resources on that web server are available to the new domain DB and all.

I believe it's called Virtual Domain Hosting, so if you are using apache you just need to set it up to do the same thing, Randy will be able to tell you how to do it in seconds.

i take it you have full access and control over the webserver?

#3 rolf

rolf

    HR 6

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 675 posts
  • Location:Suffolk UK

Posted 16 June 2011 - 06:28 AM

Thanks for the reply

Yes using apache, but someone else manages it and I'm not 100% certain I can get access to the .conf on this server, so .htaccess would be preferable if possible.

Where is Randy these days? I haven't been as active here over the last year or so and haven't seen him on the occasions I have popped my head in.

#4 Jill

Jill

    Recovering SEO

  • Admin
  • 32,926 posts

Posted 16 June 2011 - 07:02 AM

Offtopic
QUOTE
Where is Randy these days? I haven't been as active here over the last year or so and haven't seen him on the occasions I have popped my head in.


He hasn't been here for quite some time as he's been busy on other projects.


#5 1dmf

1dmf

    Keep Asking, Keep Questioning, Keep Learning

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,161 posts
  • Location:Worthing - England

Posted 16 June 2011 - 09:19 AM

hmm , are you using dedicated hosting or shared hosting?

If it's shared there may be a problem accessing resources across domains , otherwise all hosted domains would be able to access each others DSN etc.

If it's dedicated, you shouldn't have a problem, have you spoke with the hosting company about this?

P.S. come back Randy we miss you and your expertise!

#6 rolf

rolf

    HR 6

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 675 posts
  • Location:Suffolk UK

Posted 16 June 2011 - 10:31 AM

I am a little paranoid about revealing too much about our setup at the moment (we've been targeted by a very persistent hacker recently, and what he seems to lack in skill he more than makes up for in brute force determination!) so I can't really add further to that, but you've given me some stuff to look into anyway.

QUOTE
P.S. come back Randy we miss you and your expertise!


I concur

#7 cfreek

cfreek

    AAAHHHH!!1one1!

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 166 posts
  • Location:Richmond, Virginia, Earth

Posted 16 June 2011 - 11:18 AM

There are probably a lot of ways this could be done but, following your initial thought, you could possibly park the domain (as it's called in cPanel) on top of your domain, then use .htaccess with something like (untested!):

CODE
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} your-new-domain.com
RewriteRule ^(.*) /your-new-domain-subdirectory/$1 [PT]


#8 1dmf

1dmf

    Keep Asking, Keep Questioning, Keep Learning

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,161 posts
  • Location:Worthing - England

Posted 16 June 2011 - 12:47 PM

Simple eh! appl.gif

#9 Ron Carnell

Ron Carnell

    HR 6

  • Moderator
  • 966 posts
  • Location:Michigan USA

Posted 16 June 2011 - 06:13 PM

I'm not entirely clear, Rolf, on what you think you might want to share between the two domains?

Most of the resources you might share (design and navigation, for sure, and probably apps, too, like shopping carts or search) would, in my opinion, be ill advised. I suspect you would find the cost much higher than the rewards. The only thing I personally might consider sharing between two very different sites would be data?

If that's what you had in mind, I might point out that a database is not domain specific, nor for that matter, even server specific. Your CMS or shopping cart can access and pull from any database on the Internet with a valid host, username and password.

Does that many any sense for what you had in mind?




#10 1dmf

1dmf

    Keep Asking, Keep Questioning, Keep Learning

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,161 posts
  • Location:Worthing - England

Posted 17 June 2011 - 04:13 AM

I don't believe in a shared hosting environment all i have to do is guess someone's DSN and start hacking their DB, can I?

Hmm, i guess it is out there listening for a connection and valid credentials, for some reason i had in my mind that there was an added layer of security in a shared hosting environment.

#11 rolf

rolf

    HR 6

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 675 posts
  • Location:Suffolk UK

Posted 21 June 2011 - 06:59 AM

That solves it, thank you all for your input :-)

You're right, Ron, that mostly it's data I'm sharing, but there are a few other things which it's handy not to have to maintain 2 identical versions of - can't really go into it too far without being more explicit than is sensible or appropriate for the forum.

I think I've got it all sussed now anyway ale.gif




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

SPAM FREE FORUM!
 
If you are just registering to spam,
don't bother. You will be wasting your
time as your spam will never see the
light of day!