Jump to content

  • Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Subscribe to HRA Now!

 



Are you a Google Analytics enthusiast?

Share and download Custom Google Analytics Reports, dashboards and advanced segments--for FREE! 

 



 

 www.CustomReportSharing.com 

From the folks who brought you High Rankings!



Photo
- - - - -

H1 Treated Equal As H2


  • Please log in to reply
29 replies to this topic

#1 robmarketshare

robmarketshare

    HR 4

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 258 posts

Posted 19 August 2010 - 03:14 AM

I keep hearing that Google now threats H1 and H2 as the same and one could have as many H1 as one normaly could have H2s.

Does anyone know about this and/or what could be the source of this rumour?

I have read a (German?) research where sites with H1 scored significant lower in the SERPs than sites without them.
(was a few months ago, and can't find it back anymore)

#2 Alan Perkins

Alan Perkins

    Token male admin

  • Admin
  • 1,642 posts
  • Location:UK

Posted 19 August 2010 - 05:25 AM

It doesn't hurt to have a well structured page (H1[s], H2s under H1s, H3s under H2s, etc). That will help Google* to determine the true structure and content of the page.

That said, a page with good content but poor structure should rank higher than a page with poor content but good structure. Therefore, Google will have put significant effort into determining page structure where none exists or where it's all wrong (e.g. H2s instead of H1s). Relying on Google to figure this out correctly is not as good as doing it yourself. But doing it yourself is no substitute for having the content and links to back up the structure.

In other words, for best results, get your structure right, your content right and your links right.

*or your search engine of choice

#3 KarenC

KarenC

    HR 2

  • Active Members
  • PipPip
  • 34 posts
  • Location:Lafayette, LA

Posted 19 August 2010 - 07:39 AM

I watched a Matt Cutts (with Google) video in which he said that it doesn't matter how many h1 tags there are on a page. May not matter to Google, but it does matter for accessibility purposes. And for semantics.

#4 robmarketshare

robmarketshare

    HR 4

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 258 posts

Posted 19 August 2010 - 08:16 AM

As I recall he said you can have a H1 here, and here and also here if you want (or something simular). In my opinion that is not exactly the same as "as many as you want".
And more importanly; you can have them on your page, but will they also help to rank better if you put "as many as you want" on your page ?

#5 qwerty

qwerty

    HR 10

  • Moderator
  • 8,608 posts
  • Location:Somerville, MA

Posted 19 August 2010 - 09:18 AM

In HTML 5 (which I have yet to work with), there are elements that represent sections of the document: <header>, <footer>, <nav>, <article>, etc. and each of them can have their own <h1>.

There's even <hgroup> for headings with subheadings:
HTML
<article>
<hgroup>
<h1>Title goes here</h1>
<h2>Subtitle of article</h2>
</hgroup>
<p>blah blah blah</p>
</article>


#6 rolf

rolf

    HR 6

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 675 posts
  • Location:Suffolk UK

Posted 19 August 2010 - 09:26 AM

<off topic>Has there been any threads about HTML5, what everyone thinks and what they plan to do about it? Should I start one?</off topic>

#7 1dmf

1dmf

    Keep Asking, Keep Questioning, Keep Learning

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,160 posts
  • Location:Worthing - England

Posted 19 August 2010 - 09:51 AM

You can add CSS3 to that post rolf!

I prefer X/HTML , but it's at an impass currently as you cannot move on to 1.1 strict unless your web server actually serves the page up as XML not HTML!

#8 Catz

Catz

    HR 5

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 447 posts

Posted 19 August 2010 - 10:00 PM

When it comes to coding in XHTML, strict is not always better. It's really a matter of personal preference.

Transitional is a great way to go, giving you the possibility of using a combination of HTML and XHTML with CSS. It is more particular about how things are coded, using the proper syntax, but also gives you the flexibility of doing some formatting directly in the page if you like rather than everything having to be controlled with CSS.

As for the h1 issue, I prefer to stick with one per page for accessibility reasons. It helps those who require special reader software interpret your page content and determine the importance of each section of information in your page.

Edited by Catz, 19 August 2010 - 10:06 PM.


#9 1dmf

1dmf

    Keep Asking, Keep Questioning, Keep Learning

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,160 posts
  • Location:Worthing - England

Posted 20 August 2010 - 04:33 AM

QUOTE
but also gives you the flexibility of doing some formatting directly in the page if you like rather than everything having to be controlled with CSS.
But that's the point of using X/HTML and CSS , I bet most using Transitional don't bother validating their code.

I have one site I use Transitional on, not because I want to do old school bad practices but because otherwise it would require a complete re-write and if it aint broke, but I certainly wouldn't use that doc type for anything I'm building from scratch.

A doc type is relevant to the content and the way you mark it up, if you are using an older doc type just so you can bend acceptable standards and best practices, then you are using that particular doctype for the wrong reasons.

But I agree only one H1 tag and then as many sub-heading tags as required.





#10 chrishirst

chrishirst

    A not so moderate moderator.

  • Moderator
  • 6,789 posts
  • Location:Blackpool UK

Posted 20 August 2010 - 06:03 AM

HTML5 is not likely to be released as a finished specification for another twelve years (2022) and current browser support is sketchy at best.

IE9 is due to go into public beta next month (Sept 2010 for future readers) and is going to feature HTML5 and CSS3 support. Test it by all means, but be cautious about using it on sites or pages that are crucial for sales.

QUOTE
In HTML 5 (which I have yet to work with), there are elements that represent sections of the document: <header>, <footer>, <nav>, <article>, etc. and each of them can have their own <h1>.

There is no reason why that cannot be done in HTML3.2, HTML4, HTML4.01 or XHTML1.x there is no "rule" that a page MUST be about a single topic.
That is what <div>s are there for, to DIVide the page into sections.

#11 Alan Perkins

Alan Perkins

    Token male admin

  • Admin
  • 1,642 posts
  • Location:UK

Posted 20 August 2010 - 06:36 AM

Who are you calling a DIV?

#12 1dmf

1dmf

    Keep Asking, Keep Questioning, Keep Learning

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,160 posts
  • Location:Worthing - England

Posted 20 August 2010 - 06:39 AM

QUOTE
HTML5 is not likely to be released as a finished specification for another twelve years (2022) and current browser support is sketchy at best.
Really? wow, well at least it'll give me a chance to read up on it lol.gif

QUOTE
That is what <div>s are there for, to DIVide the page into sections.
But it still wouldn't be semantic to have multiple h1 tags on the page would it even if they are within their own div's?

#13 qwerty

qwerty

    HR 10

  • Moderator
  • 8,608 posts
  • Location:Somerville, MA

Posted 20 August 2010 - 09:11 AM

I think of headings as a way of defining the structure of a document rather than the sections of a document, so I only use one <h1>, but I haven't found anything on the W3C site stipulating that there should only be one.

#14 Michael Martinez

Michael Martinez

    HR 10

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,065 posts
  • Location:Georgia

Posted 20 August 2010 - 02:18 PM

QUOTE(robmarketshare @ Aug 19 2010, 01:14 AM) View Post
I keep hearing that Google now threats H1 and H2 as the same and one could have as many H1 as one normaly could have H2s.


Such claims have (so far as I have seen over the past couple of years) been based on flawed "correlation" studies, which have recently come under considerable fire.

The so-called "H1 effect" was more of a myth anyway. As one of the proponents of the use of H1 tags for optimization, I have always pointed out that Google's early documentation explicitly stated they simply analyzed the Hx elements to determine comparable font size with respect to text on the rest of the page.

i.e., if you included everything on the page in an H1 element, you'd be wasting your time.

They work when used for structure, organization, and emphasis -- which is what they were designed to do.

If your Web copy doesn't look right in a hierarchical structure, then you don't need to worry about Hx elements.

#15 Jill

Jill

    Recovering SEO

  • Admin
  • 32,916 posts

Posted 20 August 2010 - 02:23 PM

QUOTE
i.e., if you included everything on the page in an H1 element, you'd be wasting your time.


Hehe...yeah that was my M.O. in the 90's only I wasn't so blatant as to use H1 I used H3 (but kept it's own default style).

The silly things we do when learning...(I actually liked the bold of the H3).




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

SPAM FREE FORUM!
 
If you are just registering to spam,
don't bother. You will be wasting your
time as your spam will never see the
light of day!