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Wordpress Blog Component And Nofollow


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#1 bobmeetin

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Posted 24 April 2010 - 12:42 PM

Don't you love debate? With almost all my the websites I manage which required a blog component I licensed the Wordpress component adapted by corePHP to work with Joomla. For a few dollars you get all the functionality you need of a blog built into your website without the drawbacks or complications of maintaining a blog site and a separate business website (or subdomain). I'm happy with this.

However I recently got a request/complaint from a marketing guy that I should install a wordpress "dofollow" plugin because it promotes comments. I checked, but the plugin has not yet been converted by the developer to work with Joomla. It is on their list.

The real question, however, is "Is this really all that important to raise a stink? He makes it sound as if this is impacting his ability to promote sites. I tend to think that in the big picture of web marketing this is a nuance. If you add up enough nuances you end up with a pittance. At this point there are only a few blog entries on the site and modest numbers of inbound links.

I tend correlate features like this to web standards. I like to have websites pass XHTML and CSS validation, but unless they are causing problems in accessing/using the website, search engines will still do their job.

What do the experts say?

#2 Jill

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Posted 24 April 2010 - 12:44 PM

Not having nofollow on your comment links actually promotes spam, not comments.



#3 qwerty

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Posted 24 April 2010 - 01:09 PM

I'm sure lots of SEOs care about the presence of nofollow on comment links. Probably nobody else, though. Unless these sites are about SEO and you're seeking comments from SEOs, I doubt it matters.

That said, I don't like nofollow. I'd rather delete a comment from a blog than leave it up with a nofollow'ed link.

#4 bobmeetin

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Posted 24 April 2010 - 01:20 PM

QUOTE(qwerty @ Apr 24 2010, 12:09 PM) View Post
I'm sure lots of SEOs care about the presence of nofollow on comment links. Probably nobody else, though. Unless these sites are about SEO and you're seeking comments from SEOs, I doubt it matters.

That said, I don't like nofollow. I'd rather delete a comment from a blog than leave it up with a nofollow'ed link.


And what would be your reason for deleting a comment from a blog? Spam, inappropriate, other? If I am misunderstanding tell me, I can take it.

So say at some point we get the converted version of the "dofollow" plugin installed. If I understand that will enable the viewer to follow the link to somewhere offsite. Are we motivating trickles through links to would be contributors who want to get a link? Or is it generally promoting engagement?

#5 qwerty

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Posted 24 April 2010 - 01:35 PM

QUOTE
And what would be your reason for deleting a comment from a blog?

Luckily for me, it's not something I need to worry about very often. I rarely blog, and when I do, it's even more rare for anyone to bother commenting. But when they do, I make a judgment call: is the comment there because someone had something valuable to say, or is it there just to get a link?

I believe my blog is set up to put nofollow on links in comments from anyone who hasn't already commented twice, but I can change that for individual comments. But why should I bother leaving a comment in place if it's just a case of somebody trying to slip in a link?
QUOTE
So say at some point we get the converted version of the "dofollow" plugin installed. If I understand that will enable the viewer to follow the link to somewhere offsite.

The viewer can follow the link even if it's nofollow'ed. This isn't about users. It's about how a search engine views the link -- whether you're sending a signal that it's untrusted.

QUOTE
Are we motivating trickles through links to would be contributors who want to get a link? Or is it generally promoting engagement?

I'd say yes to the first question, and a qualified yes to the second. That is, for those people who will only comment on "dofollow" blogs, you're promoting engagement. But what's their motivation? Is it that they don't like the search engines dictating how we should link to other sites and so they'll only support with their interaction those blogs that refuse to use nofollow, or is that they're not interested in commenting anywhere where they won't get some link juice in return for their 30 seconds of effort?

#6 Jill

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Posted 25 April 2010 - 11:39 AM

Bottom line for me is that I don't want any comments (no matter how good they might be) if the motivation to leave the comment is a link for them.

If they don't want to comment because they won't get a link or because they'll get a nofollowed link, then that's fine with me...I don't want them on my blog because they're toads.

#7 bobmeetin

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Posted 26 April 2010 - 09:56 AM

QUOTE(Jill @ Apr 25 2010, 10:39 AM) View Post
Bottom line for me is that I don't want any comments (no matter how good they might be) if the motivation to leave the comment is a link for them.

If they don't want to comment because they won't get a link or because they'll get a nofollowed link, then that's fine with me...I don't want them on my blog because they're toads.


Toads, toads did you say! Genuine toads deserve more respect.

So are these toads so conniving that they look for a catchy blog with comments, open up the browser, view --> source, do a find in page for nofollow, then decide whether to post a comment or not based upon the result?

#8 qwerty

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Posted 26 April 2010 - 10:02 AM

Actually, there are Firefox extensions that can highlight nofollow'ed links, so they can see it as soon as they open the page.

#9 Scottie

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Posted 27 April 2010 - 07:55 AM

I guess you've never run a blog... they are targets for spambots and "paid posters" who write something in sort of the general vein of the thread in order to post a link. It's overwhelming and pointless.

While there are people out there who can contribute useful comments and do want a link in exchange, I'm going to guess that's about 1% of the actual comments you get. Vast amounts of automated or near automated spam will pretty effectively hide those "useful comments."



#10 Jill

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Posted 27 April 2010 - 08:55 AM

I just deleted a bunch this morning from the forum, in fact.

The toads that come here don't see pink links (nofollowed) in the sigs and think they will get link juice from them. But they don't because you have to be registered and logged in to even see the sigs, which search engines never are.

toad.gif

#11 bobmeetin

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Posted 27 April 2010 - 11:05 PM

Yes I'm constantly fighting spammers and spambots in my blog, with several registration databases, even newsletter registrations that I manage. Some of the bad behavior plugins help, but I tend to think that with some that get past captcha there may even be manual labor involved. So yes an unfortunately high percentage of these responses are waste and don't see the light of day.




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