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A Record Repoint


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9 replies to this topic

#1 shimlad

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Posted 14 April 2010 - 09:58 AM

Hi Guys,

so the long awaited launch of our new website will be taking place shortly.

The new site will be hosted on a different server to the current site so i will have to repoint the domain names.

now, i was under the impression i would be repointing the namer servers.

However my web design company have suggested if i prefer i can just do an A-record repoint which means i can still run my email through my own server, however the website will be hosted with them.

i didnt know you could do this,

good/ bad idea?

does it make any difference to SEO?

thanks in advance,

Shimlad

#2 Randy

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Posted 15 April 2010 - 11:15 AM

Not sure what you're even asking.

The domain name will be changing with the relaunch? Not sure why, but I hope it's a major re-branding effort.

And I have zero idea why there's a mention of your designer's hosting the web site is in there, why email is in there. No matter whether you change the nameservers or not, some server somewhere is still going to be providing DNS. And there is always going to be an A record for the Web Services part of the equation and hopefully another A record (could be CNAME but really should be an A) for the mail server. So it's not an issue of whether you change the nameserver data or not, but what you do with the local DNS.

Mail and Web are completely different services. That's why they have totally unique DNS entries. One does not have to have anything to do with the other, other than that a DNS server somewhere needs to have both entries there.

If you're changing the domain name in this relaunch the important part is to make sure the old domain pages are redirecting to the new domain pages via a 301 status. Email is simply not part of that equation. It's a totally separate service that you can configure however you want.

#3 shimlad

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Posted 15 April 2010 - 01:47 PM

Hi Randy,

thanks for the reply.

No i am not changing the domain. Simply moving servers.

My web design company have said i can keep my email on the current server but move the website to their server.

i wasn't aware i could do this.

Normally when i move servers i just change the nameservers, but they are suggesting i do something different so i can have email and hosting on seperate servers.

Sam

#4 Randy

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Posted 15 April 2010 - 04:05 PM

umm.. Why Sam?

If you have a server where you can host the site and that's not been having any issues, why would you allow your design firm to provide hosting? Chances are very high that they know less about hosting than your current provider does.

If feels like asking for trouble to me. Usually when one does that, trouble finds them.

Unless you're going to be doing away with your current hosting, simply have your design firm upload the files there. Keep your web and email hosting exactly as it is. You won't even need to make any nameserver changes.

If you're not going to be keeping your current hosting, move it to your design firm's server, but have them provide email service as well. Unless you're providing your own Mail Exchanger there is no logical reason to require two servers for the two services.

Now, with that out of the way, pretty much anything is possible. Heck, if you wanted to you could point FTP to a third server, database serving to a 4th server, etc, etc. DNS is nice that way, if you know how to make it dance. wink1.gif

#5 Jill

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Posted 15 April 2010 - 04:31 PM

QUOTE
My web design company have said i can keep my email on the current server but move the website to their server.


Like Randy said, I can't imagine why you'd want to do this.

#6 Mooro

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Posted 15 April 2010 - 05:04 PM

Totally agree.

Designers design.
Hosters host.

And to add an extra cent in...

Registrars register.

I'd never host with a design firm and I'd never register a name with my hosting company.

If you've got hosting and it isn't broken I'd not try fixing it!

smile.gif

#7 shimlad

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 04:03 AM


[/quote]
QUOTE(Randy @ Apr 15 2010, 10:05 PM) View Post
umm.. Why Sam?

If you have a server where you can host the site and that's not been having any issues, why would you allow your design firm to provide hosting? Chances are very high that they know less about hosting than your current provider does.



Hi Randy, sorry didnt make myself clear on this one. Actually this site doesnt already exist ive just been using the domain name for my email. However the server it is currently on is not powerful enough for the new site so that will defo have to go somewhere else. The web design company are simple reselling me hosting the bought from a hosting company. The hosting company are very good and are who i would go with if i was choosing. However if i went direct i wouldn't be able to get it as cheap.

So i could technically leave the email where it is.

#8 Jill

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 07:32 AM

Why pay for two servers from different hosts if it's all one domain.

There's just no sense (from what you've said) to keep your email hosted on the other server. I'm thinking that there's something you're not telling us here.

#9 shimlad

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Posted 18 April 2010 - 11:03 AM

It doesnt add any extra expense - the i need the other server anyway it hosts a collection of my smaller sites.

I just thought keeping control of my email on my own server might be advantageous, incase i get a new employee for example, so i can their email address myself rather than having to get the web design company to do it,

#10 Randy

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Posted 18 April 2010 - 12:06 PM

And it may be advantageous Sam. It may also be advantageous to have complete say over the spam control measures in place.

Here's what you need to decide...

If you want to control the Local DNS level of the domain, you do not need to make any name server changes. Leave the domain WhoIs pointing at your server. Then at your server point the main A record, the www.domain.com A or CNAME record and the FTP A or CNAME record at the other server. You would set all of this up on your current server.

Or optionally you could change the nameservers in the WhoIs record to point to the design firms server. And have them change the A record and MX record in their DNS to point to your server.

Either will work just fine in practice. So it really depends upon if you want control over your local DNS or not. Assuming both servers have DNS/Bind capabilities.




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