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Localized Keyword Research


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6 replies to this topic

#1 jmaler

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Posted 13 April 2010 - 07:51 PM

Hi all - sorry if this is a noobie question, but I didn't see the topic covered elsewhere.

I have taken Jill's excellent "search engine optimization" class on lynda.com (kudos, Jill, on a good class!) and am working on a small project for a local dentist.

While doing the keyword research, the data comes up in google's keyword tool beautifully for generic searches like "cosmetic dentistry" as you'd expect.

I believe people will search for Dentists who are close to them, like "Indianapolis Cosmetic Dentist" and some other local towns like "carmel cosmetic dentist." The rest of the search terms are the same across each location (whitening, straightening, etc.).

My question is this: Any suggestions on "best practices" to do the research for identical keywords but in 4-5 different towns? Treat them as 4-5 different searches? Lump them together? And would you do the same when using the google "allintitle:" query to assess term competitiveness?

Thanks for any advice -
John



#2 Jill

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Posted 14 April 2010 - 07:45 AM

For local keywords, i.e., with the city or state in them, you're not going to get much good data with the keyword research tools.

What I usually do is just the regular keyword research, but know that you need the localities as a modifier.

The thing to remember is that you really don't need to put the locality as part of every keyword phrase. Just having it on the page somewhere and within the Title tags is often enough, depending on the competitiveness of your products/services in your area.

P.S. glad you liked the SEO class on Lynda.com!

#3 FrenchynLondon

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Posted 22 April 2010 - 11:08 AM

Hi Jill,

I would like to bounce back on the subject as I have another question on quite the same idea.

I also took your training course on Lynda.com (it rocks btw!) and I think you did all the keyword research without changing anything in the region parameter. I thought you did so because you are in the US and that's the default parameter. My guess, sorry if I'm wrong.

Anyway, I am in the UK, London to be exact, and I was wondering if I should change the Location and Language parameters in Google Keyword Tool, as well as the Region parameter in the AIT research, in order to get a better idea of the keywords I should use. Our clients being mainly in the UK, that kind of makes sense to me. Though I am wondering if, by doing so, I will restrict my keywords research and thus the search results on Google.co.uk (whether the "Search the web" or "Search pages from the UK" is ticked).

Hope my question makes sense.

Cheers.

#4 AgSEO

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 04:46 PM


You can restrict it but make it show global search volumes as well ... that's what I'd suggest. It depends on the industry / client though because if they aren't going to be interested in US visits then it'd be detrimental to use the global figures as when you SEO their site they won't see the 10,000 visitors you suggested ... they'll only see 600 and then blame you...

#5 PatrickGer

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Posted 02 May 2010 - 12:10 PM

QUOTE
What I usually do is just the regular keyword research, but know that you need the localities as a modifier.


Does the common sense approach normally hold true? e.g. if there's a certain search volume for a keyword e.g. "dentist" in all of the US (say 100,000/day) will the search volume in a certain city of the US (in which ..say 1% of the US population live) normally be somewhere around 1,000 searches/day?

I know (and probably should stress this as it's a newbie thread) that the keyword tools never really give you anything close to the actual search volume, but tend to be off quite a bit (unless anything has changed about this?)...Im just wondering if it turns out that way in the grand scheme of things (or if the keywords people type in in different cities tend to vary greatly).

Just curious in case anyone happens to know!

QUOTE
The thing to remember is that you really don't need to put the locality as part of every keyword phrase. Just having it on the page somewhere and within the Title tags is often enough, depending on the competitiveness of your products/services in your area.


But wouldn't that mean that finding ways to get the location-modifier in or close to the keyword phrase can make it much easier in certain cases? It seems that the cost to find a way to do this (in time/money) will usually be lower than building additional quality links (for example) to increase a page's ranking in a set of SERPs.

Sorry, if Im sounding like a smart ass right now lol - I'm really just being curious. Obviously if it isn't necessary in the first place (as you can rank #1 because of a lack of competition for that phrase) then it doesn't matter...but I'm wondering if putting the location modifier in the keyword phrase (next to it) can often make a significant difference in more competitive local SERPs. - Not sure if I misunderstood this, but "dentist + city"..it seems to me that in many cases these kinds of SERPs might be somewhat competitive?



#6 qwerty

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Posted 02 May 2010 - 02:10 PM

If you need to rank for the geo-targeted term, then the more competitive the term is, the more likely it is that you need to include the location in important places.

And no, depending on the nature of the business, it doesn't necessarily average out. An Indian restaurant in Topeka Kansas ought to mention that they're in Topeka, and doing so once, like putting their address on a page, is going to get the job done. But that's because the family that lives across the street from me owns more Indian restaurants (many more, actually) than you'll find in the entire city of Topeka.

#7 PatrickGer

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Posted 02 May 2010 - 02:33 PM

QUOTE(qwerty @ May 2 2010, 09:10 PM) View Post
If you need to rank for the geo-targeted term, then the more competitive the term is, the more likely it is that you need to include the location in important places.

And no, depending on the nature of the business, it doesn't necessarily average out. An Indian restaurant in Topeka Kansas ought to mention that they're in Topeka, and doing so once, like putting their address on a page, is going to get the job done. But that's because the family that lives across the street from me owns more Indian restaurants (many more, actually) than you'll find in the entire city of Topeka.


thanks :-)




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