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Dual Navigation Links?


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7 replies to this topic

#1 seodesire

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Posted 12 December 2009 - 12:24 PM

When providing my users navigation I've been sonidering offering two routes to navigate to the same content. With this I will have d uplicated link to all high priority pages on almost every page of my blog. I'm not sure if this causes problems and would like to understand this aspect of SEO.

One problem I see is that it will most likely create more than 100 internal links per page but that's my only observation.

Thanks all once again.

SeoDesire.

#2 Jill

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Posted 12 December 2009 - 12:33 PM

It's fine. If you're worried about it, just add nofollow to the additional instances, or those that don't use the anchor text you desire.

#3 seodesire

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Posted 02 January 2010 - 02:06 PM

I'm back to this topic as I've noticed sicne changing the navigation structure to include dual navigtion links that I am losing rankings in Google. So maybe it does have the wrong kind of effect on my optimization. Although changing it would hurt the look and feel of my site.. hmmm.

#4 qwerty

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Posted 02 January 2010 - 03:10 PM

I think of it this way: most sites have a link to their home page on every page in their main navigation, their footer navigation, and their logo. Many pages will also contain a link to the home page within the content. Is that harmful in some way? I don't think so.

When it comes to important pages, it makes sense that you should make it easy to get to them, so you link to them from every page, in numerous places on those pages. The less important a page is, the less you need to link to it -- maybe just from the main navigation, but not the footer, and maybe just from the content of a single page.

Multiple links on one page to another is about usability more than anything else. Choosing to link to a page only from certain pages is hopefully more about information architecture than an effort to fiddle around with PR, but that's really what PR is about: if a page is important, it gets more links from more important pages.

If you're concerned that having two links on a page to the same page is hurting your rankings, then I suppose you could remove those second links, but I hope your usability doesn't suffer for it. Are these pages you would have linked to twice from the same page even if you didn't care how the search engines would treat that? And finally, my tests (which are completely unscientific and should not be taken as proof of anything whatsoever, but what the hey, I'll tell you anyway) indicate that search engines really don't care at all about duplicate links on a page. They're interested in knowing that page A is linking to page B, but it seems that when they find out that page A is linking to page B more than once, that second link is just ignored.

If your experience is showing you that having a second link hurts your rankings, I guess that means either that I'm wrong, you're confusing cause and effect, or some combination of both. Or neither smile.gif

#5 seodesire

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Posted 02 January 2010 - 03:31 PM

QUOTE(qwerty @ Jan 2 2010, 08:10 PM) View Post
If your experience is showing you that having a second link hurts your rankings, I guess that means either that I'm wrong, you're confusing cause and effect, or some combination of both. Or neither smile.gif


I'm starting to look through the overall change that was made and noticed that with my changes came a higher code to content ratio. i.e a lot more code in the header for my extra added on features (javascript etc) so maybe that could be causing the difference in rankings. I'm going to leave it another week before I make any final conclusions though and am hoping that I won't need to redo everything because it's all going well and looking very well too. I will try and update here then although while on the topic.. will the higher code to content ratio cause the shift in rankings and should I do something about that code?

Thanks.

#6 qwerty

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Posted 02 January 2010 - 03:58 PM

There was a brief discussion of code to content ratios just the other day.
QUOTE(Jill)
IMO, it's a load of hooey as are most things discussed in regards to SEO.


#7 Randy

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Posted 02 January 2010 - 11:12 PM

I'm starting to get a sense that a lot more changed than simply adding additional links. So first things first is to figure out what has changed and why.

For instance, links do not need javascript. And in fact if the links are produced by javascript it's as likely as not that the search engine spiders aren't even seeing them. Javascript is sometimes used to create a certain visual effect with links, but you need to be a bit careful that the url itself isn't written by a javascript routine if you want to be 100% sure the spiders are able to find and give credit for links.

The easiest way to see the pages as the spiders do is to disable your javascript. Well technically disable javascript and processing of css, but disabling javascript gets you there where links are concerned. You can also view the Text Only cache of the pages Google has on file.

Whatever you do you don't want to blame the new links for any degrading rank issues. When you have several things changing at the same time it's impossible to ascribe any ranking (or conversion rate) changes to any one of those items. It may be one, or it may be a combination. Or it may simply be that not enough time has passed yet and Google is still in the process of re-ranking the pages post changes. As a general rule when you make on page changes it can take weeks for Google to totally catch up and re-score pages.

The first step if to figure out everything that changed. Then try to figure out if any one of them might be having an adverse effect. Or if a combination is the cause. Or if you need to simply give it a bit more time for the pages to be scored again.

#8 Jill

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Posted 03 January 2010 - 10:50 AM

QUOTE
will the higher code to content ratio cause the shift in rankings and should I do something about that code?


No.

Ranking fluctuations are normal. It may not have been anything you did at all.

Look more at content changes you may have made, Title tag changes, and any site architecture changes. Those are things that will have an effect on rankings, not the other things you're concerned with.




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