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Using Tinyurl Or Actual Url On Twitter Account


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6 replies to this topic

#1 JeremyH

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Posted 17 May 2009 - 09:01 PM

I have a tool that posts a message and link on my Twitter account for every new page created on my site.

Right now the script automatically shortens my links using TinyURL. Browsing around this site I know that TinyURL uses 302 links. In addition, I know that Twitter uses the rel="nofollow" attribute for outgoing links.

My links aren't that long, and my messages are short, so I don't have to use TinyURL.

I'm debating if I should continue to use TinyURL or to actually use my own full URL. The biggest downside is that Twitter displays a shortened link if the URL is over 30 characters, effectively showing something like http://www.mydomainname.com/... This might get blinding, especially when looking at just my page, and seeing a laundry list of these links with my short messages.

Possible advantages might include link benefits from any sites that might be scraping Twitter feeds, or maybe in reference with website statistics, and simply just branding.

I've even considered my own personal mini branding tiny URL, but I think I've ruled this out.

Any advice is appreciated.

#2 Randy

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 06:12 AM

I won't make any sort of huge difference to the search engines, for the reasons you've noted. Namely the nofollows.

That said, I have to wonder if the tool that posts every single new URL to your twitter page is going to potentially lead to a higher level of scrutiny. Not only does it sound incredibly unfriendly to users (Is every single page really worthy of such publication? And what gets said in the tweet along with the URL?) but it also sounds rather spammy.

What happens if you added 100 pages to your site? Does this tool send out 100 tweets?

#3 ArticleGuy

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 10:39 AM

I dont think it really matters which version you use with twitter especially as they are no-follow.

Me i would prefer to use my own domain name that wasy people see where they are going before they click the link.

#4 bobmeetin

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 12:49 PM

I'm not sure about tinyurl, but for what it's worth, I think with bit.ly and some of the others have stats available.

On your website if you find it troubling that the links are long (I think >35 or so characters in Twitter forces a conversion) you can always set up a short URL in your .htaccess file so that the URL is likely to get converted.

Something like this in the .htaccess:
CODE
    RewriteRule blogid316.php http://mydomain.com/index.php?option=com_wordpress&p=3&Itemid=316

http://mydomain.com/index.php?option=com_wordpress&p=3&Itemid=316


can now be accessed by:

CODE
http://mydomain.com/blogid=316


and Twitter won't automatically shorten it.

#5 JeremyH

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Posted 20 May 2009 - 09:28 PM

Thanks everyone for your replies, and a good idea about using my own code, I might have to consider that in the future, but for now, I think I'll drop tinyurl and just use my won code.

QUOTE(Randy @ May 18 2009, 02:12 AM) View Post
I won't make any sort of huge difference to the search engines, for the reasons you've noted. Namely the nofollows.

That said, I have to wonder if the tool that posts every single new URL to your twitter page is going to potentially lead to a higher level of scrutiny. Not only does it sound incredibly unfriendly to users (Is every single page really worthy of such publication? And what gets said in the tweet along with the URL?) but it also sounds rather spammy.

What happens if you added 100 pages to your site? Does this tool send out 100 tweets?


The tool's original function is to tweet on any changes. I've modified the tool for my own use to tweet only if there is a new post created in a certain type of category, greatly reducing the overall tweets. I run a wiki and the messages, pretty much alert my followers there’s a new article, and inviting them to share their knowledge on the topic. I've tried to make it functional, not spammy, and I'm getting a growing following within my industry. It's not like people don't know what they're signing up for.

Any additional advantage, such as brand exposure, and a twitter search engine is a cherry on top.

#6 OptimalPages

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 12:05 AM

QUOTE(JeremyH @ May 20 2009, 10:28 PM) View Post
Any additional advantage, such as brand exposure, and a twitter search engine is a cherry on top.


I agree with what Randy said, and want to expand on the above quote.

First and foremost, I'm not a Twitter guru. Until I discovered the usefulness of TweetDeck, I largely found Twitter to be a colossal waste of time and didn't use it at all for nearly 3 months. Then, after reading several great posts on how to effectively use social media, I started Twittering again to much better effect.

Not being a follower of yours, I can't really provide a good analysis...but overall it sounds like this tool would be detrimental to how Twitter should be used. I've found that the best rule of thumb for Twittering is the 90/10 rule. Give 90%, take 10% for yourself in the form of shameless self-promotion. Answer questions, provide feedback, retweet good info, and then put up a link to your own stuff.

After only a week of following the 90/10 rule, the results to my website were quite apparent. I'm getting much better results now, and enjoying my Twitter experience instead of thinking it's just a marketing platform. I also recently purged the list of people I was following who are more interested in plugging their stuff all the time.

In other words, yes, Twitter can give great brand exposure. Just be careful what your brand says.

#7 bobmeetin

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 12:35 AM

QUOTE
I've found that the best rule of thumb for Twittering is the 90/10 rule. Give 90%, take 10% for yourself in the form of shameless self-promotion. Answer questions, provide feedback, retweet good info, and then put up a link to your own stuff.


This is right on the money. Self-indulgent self-promotion is a turn off. "Hey you, it's all about ME!" When I follow someone then get their self-promotional direct message with a link to their FREE 15 page REPORT on my secret steriods to success, it goes straight to the circular file.




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