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Managing Keywords And Keyphrases


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#1 jsp1983

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Posted 06 April 2009 - 06:33 PM

I'm building a small niche site for myself at the moment, from the ground up around a particular theme. I've just done some basic keyword research with the Google Keyword tool and have found around 100 keyphrases - mostly long-tail derivatives of around five 'themes' and variations in their phrasing order, of varying search volume and competition - that I would like to use. I don't know if that's considered 'a lot' to some of you, but I suppose these things are relative- they're certainly a lot for me, anyway.

Now, having five or so keyphrases seems quite easy to manage and implement, but I'm just wondering how I should go about doing it for 100 keyphrases? I know that some phrases will contain other phrases, so that discounts them, leaving quite a few less, but still, let's assume that there are a large number of keyphrases to manage- how would you do it? Obviously, I wouldn't want to do anything that doesn't look natural, so I won't go down the route of doing anything that looks spammy or looks as though I'm just throwing keyphrases around everywhere.

My initial idea was to work my way through the list of keyphrases, add between three and five relevant keyphrases to a page of useful content, tick them off the list and then move on to another three to five keyphrases, until the list is exhausted.

Edited by jsp1983, 06 April 2009 - 06:44 PM.


#2 Randy

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Posted 06 April 2009 - 08:03 PM

QUOTE
My initial idea was to work my way through the list of keyphrases, add between three and five relevant keyphrases to a page of useful content, tick them off the list and then move on to another three to five keyphrases, until the list is exhausted.


That's the way I do it jsp. If you take the extra time to group phrases before you start writing content you'll probably find that most will fit together with others. So with 100 phrases you'll probably end up with something like 20-30 pages, perhaps a bit more if you optimize more than one page for some phrases.

#3 jsp1983

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Posted 06 April 2009 - 08:44 PM

QUOTE(Randy @ Apr 7 2009, 02:03 AM) View Post
That's the way I do it jsp. If you take the extra time to group phrases before you start writing content you'll probably find that most will fit together with others. So with 100 phrases you'll probably end up with something like 20-30 pages, perhaps a bit more if you optimize more than one page for some phrases.


It's always good to have a little bit of confirmation to know that you're on the right track! Thanks, Randy smile.gif

Okay, so, say I have a group of three keyphrases that I want to use on a page- how do I choose their prominence/ order of importance? For example, how might I decide which ought to be the page title/ H1 text; which should be emphasised/ H2 and which might be anchor text? Let's suppose I want to target those three phrases equally.

#4 jsp1983

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Posted 08 April 2009 - 05:55 PM

QUOTE(jsp1983 @ Apr 7 2009, 02:44 AM) View Post
It's always good to have a little bit of confirmation to know that you're on the right track! Thanks, Randy smile.gif

Okay, so, say I have a group of three keyphrases that I want to use on a page- how do I choose their prominence/ order of importance? For example, how might I decide which ought to be the page title/ H1 text; which should be emphasised/ H2 and which might be anchor text? Let's suppose I want to target those three phrases equally.


Anybody? unsure.gif

#5 Randy

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Posted 08 April 2009 - 06:37 PM

Which goes in an H1 and which in an H2 isn't nearly as important as which ends up in the <title> imho.

I generally look to compare the expected search volumes of the phrases and prioritize them that way. With the idea that I want the title and first paragraph to speak directly to users who show up on a page via a search to get an early and quick confirmation that the page includes the information they searched for.

I don't necessarily follow that sort of strict rule every time, since it can mess with the flow of the content sometimes. But if there's not some other reason to move a phrase with lower search volume up in the hierarchy that's how I generally approach it.

#6 jsp1983

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Posted 09 April 2009 - 07:40 PM

QUOTE(Randy @ Apr 9 2009, 12:37 AM) View Post
I don't necessarily follow that sort of strict rule every time, since it can mess with the flow of the content sometimes. But if there's not some other reason to move a phrase with lower search volume up in the hierarchy that's how I generally approach it.


I think that's pretty much what I was getting at (or at least looking for a bit of affirmation).

Thanks for the advice, Randy cheers.gif

#7 vanzist

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Posted 10 April 2009 - 08:58 PM

per page - 2-3 keywords should be the focus

#8 jsp1983

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 02:02 PM

Has anybody used 'silos' as a technique for planning and managing their keywords? Any thoughts on it?

#9 Randy

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 02:44 PM

Silos is just another of those buzz words that doesn't really mean much of anything in the real world.

There are literally hundreds of ways you can structure a site. All of them work pretty much equally well, if the implementation is top notch. Conversely all of them fail miserably if the implementation is shoddy.

#10 Jill

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 02:50 PM

jsp1983, what's your definition of silos, so we know if we use it or not.

#11 jsp1983

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 09:55 AM

QUOTE(Jill @ May 27 2009, 08:50 PM) View Post
jsp1983, what's your definition of silos, so we know if we use it or not.


After digging a bit deeper and cutting through all the fluff that I found on the subject, it turns out it's more or less how some people would describe a fairly common sense taxonomy for websites, but focusing on manipulating internal links.

This page has a bit of a clearer explanation of it:

http://www.searcheng...h-silos-par.php



#12 Jill

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 11:39 AM

It's much less complicated (imo) to create a keyword phrase map.

#13 mal4mac

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Posted 29 May 2009 - 06:42 AM

Now you have your 100 key phrases I would find the best general key phrase and start writing a page on that key phrase, which should be the index page of your site/directory. I wouldn't think too much about the other key phrases until you've written the page, then you will have some text which you can think about in the context of the other key phrases and be able to better generate other pages for other key phrases.

I think I'm arguing for less "up front" planning than has been suggested so far. But I'm certainly agree you need that list of 100 key phrases and to find the best one before you can begin.

I'm also not suggesting my method is the best one for everyone! But if you get stuck with your planning and can't see where to go then it might be a signal that you've done enough planning and need to *get writing*.




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