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Powerline Networking


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22 replies to this topic

#1 1dmf

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 04:48 PM

Just a stupid personal post from yours truly wink1.gif

Over the years I've had such a bad experience with wireless networking, especially when I used to DJ on internet radio, the contstant dropping, skipping, freezing.

Eventually I went as far as purchasing a mini satelite dish as a USB wireless antena, yet I could always pick up someone 's network miles up the road better than mine 20 feet downstairs in the front room?

So I have finally ditched my wireless and went for powerline networking...wow what a difference.

The minute I plugged it in, no drivers or new found devices to be installed, just plug the box into a spare plug socket and the network cable into your RJ45 network port, and bang , your on the internet!

And using nothing more than your existing electicity ring mains wiring as a 200mbs home lan, Awesome!

Bloody clever idea and highly recommended to everyone!

#2 bwelford

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 09:05 AM

I use powerline ethernet networking and find it works extremely well. It depends a bit on the quality of the electrical circuits where you are. In some cases it won't work very well and there is little you can do to correct the situation.

#3 Randy

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 09:30 AM

Yes, it works quite well in most circumstances.

Unfortunately I can't use powerline networking here. Because when I moved here I needed additional power for all of the equipment I was going to be running in my office. And rather than replace the old breaker box with a new, larger one the electrician suggested putting this on a new circuit. With its own box. lol.gif

So if I tried that here I could either have powerline networking in my office and nowhere else (don't really need that!) or in the rest of the house. But not both places at the same time.

I just went with a hopped up WiFi network. Think wireless on steroids. Goodness only knows how many rules I'm probably breaking by having such a strong signal, because I'm told that my secure network router can be seen by WiFi enabled devices more than a mile away. giggle.gif

#4 Jill

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 09:30 AM

Interesting. I read about this years ago (I think in Wired or maybe Discover?) but then never heard of it again. It sounds very cool.

#5 madams

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 12:13 PM

Whats the fee for the service 1dmf?

#6 Randy

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 03:27 PM

There's no additional cost for it because technically it's not a service. It's all done by equipment. The equipment simply utilizes the existing wiring that's already running through the home or office that's there to provide electricity.

It basically goes like this.

You have a router or PC that makes the connection to the 'net. Instead of running Cat 5 cabling between the PC's there's a special adapter that comes with the kit that plugs into the normal computer or router ethernet plug, and the other end looks like an electrical plug. You plug that into an electrical socket in the wall.

It then sends your network signal over the the copper wire running through the walls. And it can be accessed from any of them.

On your 2nd (or 3rd or 4th) PC you simply plug another of the adapters into an electrical socket on one end and the other goes into the ethernet port of the computer.

No special settings required. Except for the fact that the signal is running over your electrical wiring it works just the same as if you ran a Cat 5 cable between the machines.

The cost of the kit depends upon how many computers you have and thus how many adapters you need. I've not looked into it in awhile, but I've seen packages for 2-3 computers (and sometimes a WiFi component too) that start at around $100 here in the states.

#7 1dmf

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Posted 09 March 2009 - 05:05 AM

No fee just initial equipment purchase, I still have to pay for my normal broadband and use a standard firewall router to hanfdle the ethernet network.

It simply uses your existing home power ring mains as if you had run ethernet Cat5/6 UTP cabling throughout every room in the house smile.gif

I've been running it for a couple of months now and I absolutely love it!

I've never lost a connection to the internet once, i get the full speed out of my ADSL connection, I really do love it!

OK yes there are some downsides......

You must...

A ) as Randy says have the house on the same ring mains.

B ) Have deep pockets, as depending on no. of rooms you want to power it can be fairly expensive, but it has been cheaper in the long run than the 3 routers and 3 adapters I tried wireless before I gave up and went powerline networking

C ) Have a few spare power sockets in the room, the instructions say you cannot plug it into a multi-block and must be on its own direct into a spare plug socket, so if you have a room with only one power socket, you're stuffed, the powerline network adapter would go in on it's own and leave no sockets to power up the PC, or the hoover, or bedside lamp etc. etc.

I guess it depends on the age of your house, if it's an old victorian house and hasn't been rewired, well you might have a problem, so make sure you analyse the quantity of power sockets available in the room you intend to use it!

Not sure but I think no. of power sockets is likely to be more a UK problem than USA, but it's still certainly worth checking out before you purchase!

But if you can run it, get it, best networking money i've ever spent!

Bet the thing will break now i've told everyone how great it is! lol.gif

Edited by 1dmf, 09 March 2009 - 05:13 AM.


#8 Nueromancer

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Posted 09 March 2009 - 12:29 PM

QUOTE(Jill @ Feb 6 2009, 02:30 PM) View Post
Interesting. I read about this years ago (I think in Wired or maybe Discover?) but then never heard of it again. It sounds very cool.


Yeh I switched a while back from wirless as the wirless router stoped brindging the wirless to wired side i also did it so that i could get at better link for doing podcasting from rooms otehr than the one where the routers set up.

You do have to buy all the powerline adaptors from the same manafacturers and the same speed using 85Mbs adaptores I get a link speed of 35-40 Mbs (about twice the theoretical max for 802.11g) - how eaver if you have a lot of adaptors dont forget that its a shared media.

#9 tcolling

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 01:56 AM

I have that setup at my house (actually, AT&T supplied the equipment at no charge as part of the install of my "U-Verse" service from them!)

It works well, at least as fast as wifi and probably faster. I have read that it degrades performance if your computers are not on the same power circuit as the router.

#10 1dmf

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 05:04 AM

QUOTE
how eaver if you have a lot of adaptors dont forget that its a shared media.
Is that not the same for any network?

a 10/100/1000 hub or switch is max shared bandwidth isnt it?

For us there is only me using it upstairs in my music room, and we got the 200mb adpaters, our broadband is 20mb/1mb so plenty of bandwidth capacity, though this summer we are meant to be getting 50mb/2mb , which coupled with the 200mb powerline network, it should fly! superman.gif

#11 Nueromancer

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 11:34 AM

QUOTE(1dmf @ Mar 10 2009, 10:04 AM) View Post
Is that not the same for any network?

a 10/100/1000 hub or switch is max shared bandwidth isnt it?

For us there is only me using it upstairs in my music room, and we got the 200mb adpaters, our broadband is 20mb/1mb so plenty of bandwidth capacity, though this summer we are meant to be getting 50mb/2mb , which coupled with the 200mb powerline network, it should fly! superman.gif


for wired ethernet networks Hubs are shared, switches are full speed between two devices on the same switch though the uplinks are shared by the downstream ports which is why switches have faster uplink ports than the ports used for normal devices.

Note that these days you cant realy buy a hub as such

#12 1dmf

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 11:45 AM

gotcha , thanks.

#13 rolf

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 06:58 AM

COOL!!

I've been trying to get a PC to work in the bedroom over wi-fi and it's being a real PITA, to the point where I have been considering laying a cat5 cable from the office, but this sounds like a much better solution.

How would I find out if the power sockets are on the same ring before laying out the cash for the equipment?

#14 1dmf

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 07:18 AM

hey Rolf,

Tricky, most houses are , I think Randy had a scenario out of the norm and specific to his set up as he specifically had his system put in that way.

I guess an electrician can tell you and i think you can get a device you plug in each socket which sends a signal and will tell you if they are on the same ring mains.

We bought ours retail from the PC world shop, so if it didn't work, we would have simply taken them back for a refund!

That might be the best option, as buying on line is cheaper but usually far more hasle when things go wrong.

#15 Randy

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 08:58 AM

Yeah, I do have a really strange setup here. Partly by my doing but mostly because someone added a second, completely separate circuit for an addition being built onto the house rather than simply upgrading the original circuit box. I'd hazard to guess 95% or more are going to be on a single circuit or ring, so you should be fine.

The only time I'd start to get worried a bit is if you have two separate circuit breaker boxes (or equivalent) that electricity passes through. That's what I have. One circuit breaker box in the basement (the original) and a second one out in the Garage that was part of an addition to the house a few decades ago. Don't ask me why they stuck in a second circuit for the additions, but that's what they did! Since it was so under utilized I simply used this 2nd circuit when I ran in new power to my office.




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