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Welcome To The Link Building Forum!


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51 replies to this topic

#1 Debra

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Posted 24 July 2003 - 10:39 PM

Welcome to the linking section of High Rankings Forum. This is the place to learn and share ideas about link building, promotions, optimization and everything else associated with this interesting issue!

It's not just about slapping links on a page...... it's about creating partnerships, promotions and long term relationships that will sell/advance your product or service.

It's not linking, it's marketing :nerd:

See you in the forums!

#2 Jill

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Posted 24 July 2003 - 10:49 PM

I'd like to add that it's not much about reciprocal linking either, so make sure you're out of that mindset too!

Jill

#3 markymark

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Posted 25 July 2003 - 07:28 AM

OK, Jill, I"ll bite. You're saying it's not much about reciprocal linking and that's fine as far as it goes. If you have resources, articles, forums even, then getting non-reciprocal and 'courtesy' links is not a difficult task. However, if your site is a pure play ecommerce site, then how would you suggest you do it without reciprocal linking.

Now I know that your first response would probably be - directories like Yahoo and Dmoz, JoeAnt, etc. plus industry specific portals/directories will give you a link, but I want to bypass the obvious. What's the next step after that ?

Personally, I am a big believer in reciprocal linking providing it provides traffic. I've a client selling lingerie - but they only ship to the US and Canada and we've tied up a few good reciprocal links with lingerie sites in Europe who only ship to Europe. Does that not show that reciprocal linking has merit ?

#4 Jill

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Posted 25 July 2003 - 08:12 AM

I'm not saying that you can't have or get reciprocal links, just that your mindset should not be, "okay, I have to start a recipriocal links campaign." I see so many posts from newbies who *think* that every link has to be reciprocated. The word has been used so much that they believe that the reciprocal part is somehow important to their rankings. In reality, the reciprocal part is only there out of necessity for some sites and links.

I'm sure our esteemed moderator, Debra aka Magnolia, will have plenty of ideas, but one thing I find is a great link builder along with creditbility builder is to distribute articles that contain a byline and link to your site.

If you're not a writer, there are ghostwriters who can write them for you. There are soooooo many benefits beyond link building that this does for you, which span across many of the topics on this forum!

Jill

#5 markymark

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Posted 25 July 2003 - 08:30 AM

one thing I find is a great link builder along with creditbility builder is to distribute articles that contain a byline and link to your site.

LOL. 'creditbility' - now that's something we should all be after.

Seriously, though, most of the sites I work with are not interested in/don't have the time to write 'articles' - they want to sell more widgets and rightly, that is the focus of their business and their website.

I agree that the 'reciprocal' part of link building has become overused, but the fact is that links have a monetary value and if I don't want to or can't pay money, then barter (in this case, reciprocal links) is the next best thing.

#6 Jill

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Posted 25 July 2003 - 08:41 AM

Okay, so sue me...I can't spell c-r-e-d-i-b-i-l-i-t-y! (I will write it 100 times on the board!)

Seriously, though, most of the sites I work with are not interested in/don't have the time to write 'articles' - they want to sell more widgets and rightly, that is the focus of their business and their website.

Well, then that is their loss because they will be missing out on many, many opportunities to bring traffic in their own right, get tons of links, and establish credibility :trash:

And like I said, your client doesn't have to have the time. That's what copywriters are for.

Lingerie? Easy. How about articles such as What are the latest trends in lingerie?, or How to Surprise Your Husband on Your 20th Anniversary (oops...little too close to home on that one. :type: )

Anyway, the point is, that yes, your client DOES have time (or money) to make it so. Saying they don't is just an excuse. Any one or any site can use that technique.

Don't forget there are also forums that specialize in any topic, and many of them also allow signatures. Not saying anyone should spam a forum, but if you become an actual participant it can also work wonders.

Jill

#7 bwelford

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Posted 25 July 2003 - 09:22 AM

Anyway, the point is, that yes, your client DOES have time (or money) to make it so. Saying they don't is just an excuse. Any one or any site can use that technique.


I think that links to an idea that hits me often as I talk to potential clients.

For me, the most important "real" presence for a company is their web site. Few potential customers see their building or meet one of their sales representatives. Many potential customers may look at their web site or see a listing in a SERP. On that basis, they may decide to look elsewhere for the product or service they are trying to find.

Some people see a web site only as an electronic brochure. Nice to have, but it may or may not do much for sales. So it has a few typos, well we will get around to correcting those, when we have a moment. However marketing is not the priority this month.

Yet if the front door of their company building was defaced by a spray painter, they would have someone in right away. Or if the telephone system was down, they would be scurrying to put it right.

If people do see their web site as the most important thing to get right first, then they will look at the point Jill has made and spend a little bit of money to improve how they appear to the "real" world.

Barry Welford

#8 markymark

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Posted 25 July 2003 - 09:23 AM

Anyway, the point is, that yes, your client DOES have time (or money) to make it so. Saying they don't is just an excuse. Any one or any site can use that technique.

Don't forget there are also forums that specialize in any topic, and many of them also allow signatures. Not saying anyone should spam a forum, but if you become an actual participant it can also work wonders.

My clients tend to be SMEs and they really do not have the time to be messing around in forums. If they wish to do that, then all well and good, but they've hired me to build links to their sites, not to do it themselves.

On the other point - I agree, anyone can use that technique if they wish, particularly if they wish to brand themselves as an 'expert'. That's fine - I"m not knocking the technique itself. What I am saying is that it isn't a viable strategy for all businesses. It may be as simple as they don't want to write an article (many people hate writing anything) and can find better ways of spending money than hiring a ghostwriter.

#9 markymark

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Posted 25 July 2003 - 09:34 AM

Barry,

I agree with what you're saying about that particular mentality. We've all come across it time and again, I'm sure.

I'm not certain how that equates with writing articles to gain links though. Hell, if a client wants to do that, then fine - and I have several that do, particularly in the services and consultancy fields but I also have many that wouldn't consider it. After all, let's say a ghostwritten article costs $200 - they could put that money into AdWords or Overture and get a guaranteed return on it rather than something nebulous like a 'good quality link' or three.

#10 Jill

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Posted 25 July 2003 - 10:02 AM

What's the difference in whether they pay you to dig up reciprocal links, or if they pay you (or someone) to post at forums for them, or write articles for them, or whatever.

Isn't reciprocal linking just as nebulous? I don't understand your point!

Surely, your client doesn't have to do any particular thing that they don't want to do, but it's simply being thrown out there as another way to build links!

Jill

#11 markymark

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Posted 25 July 2003 - 10:10 AM

LOL. I think I went off-track a little, but my original point was this: what strategies would people suggest when link building for a pure play ecommerce site ? You suggested articles but personally I don't think it's the best option for a pure ecommerce site. And that's pretty much where we've got to.

#12 Bernard

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Posted 25 July 2003 - 10:44 AM

If the site can offer giveaways, there are a lot of opportunities for listings on sites that catalogue such things.

For example, free software (even demo versions) can open doors to hundreds of shareware/download sites.

#13 Debra

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Posted 25 July 2003 - 11:00 AM

"However, if your site is a pure play ecommerce site, then how would you suggest you do it without reciprocal linking. "

This is a question I get from a lot of SEO's when they contact me about doing links campaigns.

Not every web site/online business benefits from a recip linking campaign. Some products don't lend themselves to this type of program and some do. I maintain that it's NOT about linking, it's about marketing your program through links.

Writing articles IS a good way to get your link published in industry specific publications. Creating a link promotion is another. Ecommerce sites selling products promote those items in the offline world everyday. How do they do this? Who do they partner with? What special offers do they make?

A lot of that can be implemented online through a link promotion campaign as well.

Hey...... I have to run but will come back later and outline a links promotion if it's helpful for anyone. Just finished one that would make a good sample case.

#14 Debra

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Posted 26 July 2003 - 02:59 AM

Back! And as promised, I have an example of a link promotion campaign I recently completed that may help markymark's earlier question -

"However, if your site is a pure play ecommerce site, then how would you suggest you do it without reciprocal linking. "

Here are several alternative types of link campaigns:

1. Article writing. If you have them, get them out to the publications within your industry. Offer the publication ( and/or it's readers) an incentive for posting the article. Write the incentive so you can monitor it's success ( think positive) and use that information in the future.

Be sure to make the article viral. Add a tagline at the bottom that encourages the readers to place the article on their sites. Of course it goes without saying that the article has a hyperlink or two to your web site..... -_-

What, no articles? Don't write? Hire a ghostwriter. I know a couple and I bet others here at the forums do as well. This is not a difficult process. A good ghostwriter will be able to review the site and create an informative article.


2. Buy a link. Yup, that's right, buy your way in. I've been successful with this strategy lately, the new Google program has helped imo.

I'm not talking about banner links; offer to buy space on a web site you feel will send traffic and ( of course) has decent PR. Keep the ad short, simple and impactful. Create something that uses all your keywords wrapped around your URL. This is link optimization at it's best.


3. Dangle a carrot.

Link promotions garner high quality links, promote your brand, send traffic and help with link pop. It's really the best of the best when it comes to linking.

If you want your link promotion to be successful, you have to offer more than just a link. Link promos are about added value......special offers, exclusive issues. It's a special "gimme" that can't be gotten anywhere else but through your link offer.

Here's an example of a link promotion I conducted last year.

My sample site asked I not post their URL but did agree to let me use the case in this posting. They are a national real estate relocation site that initially wanted a link campaign because their SEO told them they needed one. Lucky for me, the real estate marketing person was someone who knew enough about SEO to understand the importance of implementing the right link campaign.

After we determined who her target audience was and where they were, we crafted the promotion. In this case, it was a free relocation package that included, among other things, discount coupons to a national hotel chain, restaurant and moving company.

Together we crafted a carefully worded, impactful yet short email message with the appropriate links and targeted sales pitch. The emails were sent to companies in complimentary markets - i.e. real estate firms, home inspection companies, pest control companies, regional directories, etc. The response was o.k. - not great, just o.k...... and then I had an idea!

I started contacting the housing offices of colleges........by coincidence, I started this campaign in May, the same month colleges were getting out. I wrote the housing directors and pointed out that our free relocation packages could be a helpful tool to freshman students in the fall and would they post our link?

Bingo. I hit on an emotional need and it worked. Out of the 100 colleges I contacted, 42 of them posted the link. Anyone who does this knows that's a super return ratio.

To wrap up ( just noticed how long this was!) let me say this - regardless of what type of link campaign you implement, it should be part of an overall SEO program. Well written sites that offer quality content and viable products are the types of sites others will link to. Remember! It's not linking, it's marketing!

#15 Jill

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Posted 26 July 2003 - 01:52 PM

Great post and great ideas, Debra!

For anyone interested, Debra will be speaking on this topic at the SES conference in a couple of weeks. I'm sure there will be even more great tips, and definitely the opportunity to ask questions. I believe Debra is speaking on the last day.

Jill




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