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I Hate My Job


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91 replies to this topic

#46 meta

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Posted 06 August 2003 - 09:59 PM

You very rearly hear a good idea from an employee except how to get out of work.

I know that's generalizing but I find it to be the truth.

It certainly is generalizing and you must not have looked far to find anything better.

My work life is lived largely on the phone, all day I speak with employees (and a few owners) of businesses in every major industry and many minor ones. It never ceases to delight me when I speak with a person who is sincerely motivated to do good and useful work, and in that sense I'm delighted every day.

Just today I heard from

An employee of a services firm who is searching for a way to help hospitals better identify people at risk for cardiac arrest, infections and other complications so that they might improve preventive care and save lives and quality of life,

A utility employee who has boldly ventured into experimenting with an area of mathematics that is not used in his industry, in the hope that it will help him better understand his customers. He also has taken the lead and is working to introduce this technique to others in his industry.

A banking employee who is motivated to help her coworkers squeeze more information from their mounds of data.

This is an ordinary day for me. My employee clients and coworkers are primarily people who are motivated to do a good job, and they are full of good ideas.

#47 market seeker

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Posted 06 August 2003 - 10:18 PM

You very rearly hear a good idea from an employee except how to get out of work.

I know that's generalizing but I find it to be the truth.

It certainly is generalizing and you must not have looked far to find anything better.

My work life is lived largely on the phone, all day I speak with employees (and a few owners) of businesses in every major industry and many minor ones. It never ceases to delight me when I speak with a person who is sincerely motivated to do good and useful work, and in that sense I'm delighted every day.



I own an auto detail business catering to the high end market. Talking on the phone won't break your employer but letting someone detail and make a mistake on a $300,000 car can hurt me. I don't tolerate anything that could hurt me financially.

In this business anyone that is good can do it themselves which is my big problem
with finding good help. Every business is different

Edited by market seeker, 06 August 2003 - 10:26 PM.


#48 market seeker

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Posted 06 August 2003 - 10:24 PM

I honestly can't believe you meant that the way it sounds? Happiness is defined by the freedom to buy what ever you want?

Yup, no bills, no credit, no worries about money, that's what I call true happiness. Everything else is overrated.

#49 qwerty

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Posted 06 August 2003 - 10:33 PM

Love, friendship... those are pretty ok too.

#50 market seeker

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 12:22 AM

Love, friendship... those are pretty ok too.

I won't dispute that! but they're numbers 2 and 3 in my list of priorities. It takes a long list of priorities to achieve total happiness but it always takes money to do the things that make you happy.

If you can live on love and friendship all the more power to ya.

A good business plan followed at a young age will make one happy buisness owner at the age of 40.

#51 deborah2002

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 07:44 AM

Wow, Marketseeker. That's an interesting perspective, I suppose. I've been in a position where I had all bills paid, a hubby who made over $350,000.00 a year and lived in a huge house and believe me--I wasn't happy. I walked away from it all with nothing but my 2 boys and the determination to make MY life work.

Yeah, money is great. I don't have the "toys" I used to. I stress a little when the bills start rolling in. But, I am happier now in my 2 bedroom apartment than I was in that 4 bedroom spread I had before.

Would I turn down the lottery if I won it? Hell, no. But there is a price to be paid for everything.....the friends I have found in the last year, my independence, my confidence and my new found abilities are well worth (and beyond) $350 k.

Again, I'm not knocking what you are saying, I just know that the joy in my life really COULDN'T be bought. Funny, my life is better now than in over 10 years--even without the big $$.

JMO

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#52 dragonlady7

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 08:38 AM

I was initially horrified on reading Market Seeker's post. But I see what he's getting at. I once had a friend who decided not to go to the college that was best for her, but instead to go to a little hole in the ground that didn't even offer her major, so that she could be with her true love.
Who, of course, cheated on her repeatedly, dumped her four times, and jerked her around for a whole semester.
She wised up, fortunately, and transferred to the other end of the country, to study something she was actually interested in. (The cheating True Love, btw, died of lukemia, and my friend was so sick of being manipulated that she didn't answer the letter telling her of the terminal illness, because she was sure it was just another ploy. When it turned out to be true, my friend fortunately had the presence of mind not to feel guilty.)

So holding love to be more sacred than money is Hollywood claptrap and will get you burned.

However, holding money sacred won't really get you much farther.
I've never been presented with a clear-cut choice: On this hand, Love; on this hand, Money. But I was raised by near-penniless parents, and was never unhappy for it. I've never learned to love money, because I've never really had much of it. I'd love to not have to worry about it; it's a terrible drain on my feeble brain just now to figure out how to pay my bills.

But my boyfriend supported me for six months while I was job-hunting, and I couldn't afford to live on my own without splitting the bills with him. He's part of my business plan; he's taught me quite a bit about programming, and is doing the back-end of my complex (but soon to be awesome) professional site. Love and money are actually seldom at odds, and so seeking a balance of the two is probably the surest route to happiness I can think of.

If anyone's disappointed and wanted angst-filled rambling, I do actually have a blog. Rated R for language, adult situations, immaturity, incoherence, violence, and prattling. :aloha:

#53 Jill

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 08:55 AM

Here's a little twist on the love or money theme.

What I've found is that the more you focus on money, the harder it will be to obtain it. When you stop focusing on money, and just focus on doing the right thing, money will come to you as a result. It's obviously not as simplistic as that, as you still have to work hard, have skills, be smart, etc., but there really is some powerful stuff at work with this theory.

Worked for me, at least! :aloha:

Jill

#54 qwerty

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 09:11 AM

Cool. Now I've got 2 blogs to read regularly: Dragonlady's and the political spewings of an old friend in London. :aloha:

#55 deborah2002

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 09:23 AM

Jill, now that we are "straying" from the original thread (yet again!), I was sure you'd have moved us by now! :aloha:



deb

#56 stoli

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 09:54 AM

I also dont think making tons of money will make anyone happy. It may make life a little easier but wont solve all problems.

In the end you still have to get up in the morning. You still have to brush your teeth. While brushing your teeth you probably will have to look in the mirror.
If you are happy, you pretty much know it.

However, money should be a motivating factor. It should motivate a person to try harder. Hopefully, a good raise or landing a good job or account will come as a result.

Not that I actually know anyone who has ever won tons of kabillions of $$$ from the lottery, but I dont think it really made them any happier. It probably caused a few more worries. Surely it brings fun, enjoyment, and security, but I dont think that happiness is the same.

Just my 2 penneys thrown in the tip jar :aloha:

#57 market seeker

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 10:13 AM

Would I turn down the lottery if I won it? Hell, no.  But there is a price to be paid for everything.....the friends I have found in the last year, my independence, my confidence and my new found abilities are well worth (and beyond) $350 k.



deb

And what if instead of "some guy your husband" making 350 a year, it was you who owned a business and made that money. Then you would have it all and still be happy.

#58 Jill

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 10:14 AM

Jill, now that we are "straying" from the original thread (yet again!), I was sure you'd have moved us by now! :aloha:



deb

Since the original topic of this thread was more of a rant kinda thing, I don't think it's a problem to stray off topic a bit.

Ramble and rant all you want in this particular one!

Jill

#59 deborah2002

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 10:19 AM

Market Seeker, on that point we agree--but my original point is that even without the big $$, I am extremely happy. I'm not discounting how great the lotter numbers would be, I'm just saying that sometimes happiness isn't just being able to pay your bills --it's the people you surround yourself with and the happiness that is derived from that.

To an extent, we are saying the same thing, only differently! (I think) :aloha:

deb

#60 market seeker

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 10:31 AM

appearently I'm not explaining my self sufficiently.

point: divorce rate is 50%, reason money
point: 90 % of the elderly are in poverty
point: only 5% of business lasts more that 5 years Reason: bad business plan and no money

If you don't start when you're young to look out for your future you will have the same stories about how you had it at one time and now your soooo happy you dont.

be independent, don't rely on another person, make your own money and you will be happy. excuses and reasons are for the broke. I would hate to work for 10 or 15 years with another person in charge of the money only to lose everything.

It's just not good business

And at no time did I say money is everything!!!




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